Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Recipes from the HSCG 2017 conference: Niacinamide & willow bark hydro-gel - part two, all about Sepinov EMT 10

In yesterday's post, we took a look at the ingredients to create a hydrating and oil free recipe with niacinamide and willow bark. Today, let's take a look at this new gelling agent and what it offers.

I’m using Sepinov EMT 10 as my gelling agent (INCI: Hydroxyethyl Acrylate / Sodium Acryloyldimethyl Taurate Copolymer). It's a pre-neutralized polymer you can use to make gels, cream gels, and alcoholic gels, and can be added to an emulsion as a rheology modifier (thickener).

The recommended usage rate is 0.5% to 5%. The lower usage rate is for including it in lotion, while the higher levels are creating gels or cream gels where EMT 10 is the main ingredient.

Why use this instead of another gelling agent? Because it’s not like normal gels. It can make a perfectly fine thick gel, but it’s awesome for making things like facial sera thanks to its silky skin feel. If we think of gels as being bouncy and watery, EMT 10 makes gels that are smooth, only slightly bouncy, and less watery than a normal gel. I’ve yet to make a clear gel with it, but that’s no big deal when you’ve made something lovely and moisturizing.

It’s an anionic or negatively charged ingredient, so it’s not compatible with cationic or positively charged ingredients. This means you can’t add cationic polymers like honeyquat, polyquat 44, polyquat 7, and so on, as well as emulsifiers like Incroquat BTMS-50, Rita BTMS-225, and so on. Some hydrolyzed proteins might be right out, too, so if you want to include those, do a test batch to see how they turn out.

To make a gel, add it to the water phase, then mix with a hand or stick mixer. As you’ll see in my recipes, I get all my ingredients into the container, then add Sepinov EMT 10 last and mix very well. The gel will be ready in minutes.

To make an alcoholic gel – inedible, sadly – you add all your water ingredients, then Sepinov EMT 10, then your alcohol while mixing. This might seem like a strange idea, but this is how you could make something like salicylic acid, which is soluble in water, or hand sanitizers.

For a cream gel, which is one with oils, add it to the oil phase, then add the entire water phase while mixing. The data sheets for this product say it can handle up to 50% oils, but that didn’t work for me. I tried 40% and 45% oils and esters, and each time had an epic fail. I suggest no more than 10% oils, esters, and oil soluble ingredients at first and see how it works for you. I liked 10% - you’ll see that shortly – and thought it was lovely and moisturizing.

To use it in a lotion as a thickener and rheology modifier, add to the heated oil phase. Remember, you can’t use it with Incroquat BTMS-50 or other positively charged emulsifiers.

As an aside, the reason we add powders to the heated oil phase is to make sure they don’t clump when we get them into the water phase. I know it seems counterintuitive, especially when you see it for ingredients that are really water soluble, like our carbomers and gums, but it really works! 

Since EMT 10 is stable from pH 3 to 10, it can be used in more acidic products, like those with AHAs or salicylic acid. It’s a great ingredient for facial products – I especially like spot treatments, eye products, and sera – thanks to that silky skin feel and ability to emulsify oils. The recommended usage rate is 0.5% to 5%. The lower usage rate is for including it in lotion, while the higher levels are creating gels or cream gels where EMT 10 is the main ingredient.

It’s an anionic or negatively charged ingredient, so it’s not compatible with cationic or positively charged ingredients. This means you can’t add cationic polymers like honeyquat, polyquat 44, polyquat 7, and so on, as well as emulsifiers like Incroquat BTMS-50, Rita BTMS-225, and so on. Some hydrolyzed proteins might be right out, too, so if you want to include those, do a test batch to see how they turn out.

Sepinov EMT 10 is a silky feeling gellant when compared to carbomers like pre-neutralized sodium carbomer, Ultrez 20, or Sepimax ZEN. You can use those gellants in this recipe instead of EMT 10 at their suggested usage rates. It can emulsify oils – I’ve found it’s best at 10% or so – and it can handle acids, like alpha-hydroxy acids, fruit acid extracts, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, and more.

You can buy Sepinov EMT 10 at Lotioncrafter!

Please note, I supply these links to Lotioncrafter as my thanks for sponsoring my demonstration at the HSCG conference. These are not affiliate links and I receive nothing if you click through or if you buy ingredients from that shop. I have them here to make it easier for you to find things as well as showing my gratitude for Jen's generosity! 

Join me tomorrow and we'll finish up this recipe!

Oh, as a note, if you're a $10 subscriber to my Patreon page, Lotioncrafter is offering you a 7% discount on ingredients until Saturday, June 10th! Pretty awesome, eh?

Final note, if you're interested in learning more about gels using Sepinov EMT 10 and simply can't wait for me to post things on this blog, please check out the e-zine I wrote on the topic, entitled Gels! Ooey, gooey fun! which includes recipes for Ultrez 20 and Sepimax ZEN. 

2 comments:

Charlette said...

Hello Susan,
Love this formula! I've added some other ingredients to your original formula (and remove 10% water) : small percentages of Squalane Light/LC Fision Lift (which has proteins--but just love this product)/ Plum Oil/ Argerilene which all add up to 10%. Love these additions. The end product is still light and wonderful as an under makeup moisturizer. It becomes a bit more serum-y. The emulsion holds together just fine, however is there a thickener you would recommend in a very small amount to make it a bit less liquidy?
Appreciate your suggestions!
Charlette Sgro

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Charlette! You could add a bit more Sepinov EMT 10 or you could try adding a titch of ZEN, which will thicken it. I would suggest trying 0.5% to see what you think. You can go as high as 3%.

Isn't this an awesome recipe? I just love it!