Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Newbie Tuesday: Creating a facial toner, part two

Last week we started making toners. This week, we'll modify them using some of the interesting ingredients we can get from our suppliers.

As an aside, there's nothing wrong with a simple toner of rose water or witch hazel plus preservative. Simple can be just as awesome as super and ridiculously complicated, so don't stress if you've made something you love and want to leave it that way.

In the shopping list, I suggested a few ingredients you could use in this series, so let's take a look at how to integrate them into a toner.

Humectants are awesome ingredients. They draw water from the atmosphere to your skin to hydrate and moisturize. In toners, we could use glycerin, sodium lactate, sodium PCA, hyaluronic acid, sorbitol, propylene glycol, butylene glycol, honeyquat, and more. A little goes a long way. We can use as little as 0.1% hyaluronic acid, 2% glycerin or sodium lactate, 2% sodium PCA, 3% honeyquat, and so on in our products to offer that great hydration we want on our skin.

Hydrolyzed proteins are a great way to hydrate your skin with just a titch of an ingredient. I've suggested that you try using hydrolyzed oat protein and silk amino acids or silk protein in this series, but there are so many more.to choose from like baobab*, rice*, quinoa*, pea, lupine, soy*, or Phytokeratin, a mix of corn, wheat, and soy. You can find them listed as hydrolyzed proteins, hydrolysates, amino acids, We'll use these in small amounts - 2% to 5%, generally - in the heated water phase.

Cationic polymers, like polyquat 7 and honeyquat, condition skin by forming a tiny film that moisturizes in a process called adsorption. There are so many to choose from - look for the word "quaternized" when at your supplier's shop to see what you can get like rice, soy, silk, and so on - and you don't need much. For something like polyquat 44, 0.5% will do. For polyquat 7 and honeyquat, I generally use 2% to 3%.

As an aside, honeyquat can smell fishy to some people, which is why I'm a bit hesitant to recommend it for something like a toner where you can't obscure the smell with a fragrance or essential oil. It's a very strong smell for me, so I don't use it much any more, except in hair care products where I can add something like white chocolate, blueberry poundcake, or oatmeal, milk & honey fragrance oils. If you have used Incroquat BTMS-50 and noticed a fishy smell, don't buy honeyquat. This is a normal smell for these ingredients as they are quaternary ammonium compounds, and ammonia can smell very fishy to some people. 

Aloe vera is another ingredient I recommended purchasing for this series, and it's an ingredient I absolutely love using for my facial products. It's hydrating, emollient, and anti-inflammatory, all great things for our faces.

We use aloe vera liquid, not the gel, on the blog. The gel version of aloe vera is gelled using a carbomer, like Ultrez 20, and it isn't necessary to gel this toner recipe. (Yet...gels are on their way!) 

I've just started using the 200x powder, which is so easy to incorporate into my products. You could use a titch of it in this recipe - 0.5% in the water phase - or make up a batch of the liquid. I create a bottle of aloe vera liquid by adding 1 gram of this 200 x powder to 198.5 grams distilled water and 0.5 grams liquid Germall Plus. Now I have a bottle of aloe vera. I can add this liquid at up to 10% in the water phase.

Panthenol is one of my favourite ingredients of all time! It improves stratum corneum hydration, reduces redness and inflammation, increases wound healing by stimulating skin epithelialization, improves skin barrier mechanism repair, mitigates itching and soothes irriation, and behaves as a humectant. It's an amazing ingredient for all skin types, and I encourage you to use it at 2% to 5% in the cool down phase if you have the liquid and in the heated water phase if you have the powder.

So where are we now? We have all kinds of ingredients that will hydrate, condition, and moisturize our skin. Let's make a few toners, eh?

Let's modify the simple toner for dry skin from last week!

SIMPLE TONER FOR DRY SKIN - ROSE WATER & CUCUMBER
HEATED WATER PHASE
69% distilled water
20% rose water or lavender hydrosol
5% witch hazel
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
0.5% allantoin

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% powdered cucumber extract
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

What could we add to this recipe?

Hydrolyzed silk protein or silk amino acids are a great choice for dry skin as the molecules are small enough to penetrate the skin. Let's add that at 2% in the heated water phase.

Aloe vera will film form and moisturize, so let's add that at 10% liquid or 0.5% powder into the heated water phase.

Honeyquat or polyquaternium 7 would be a great addition at 2%. (If you're using honeyquat, please put that in the cool down phase as it can smell like melted plastic fish if it's warmed up too much.)

And panthenol is excellent at 2% in the heated water phase (powder) or 2% in the cool down phase (liquid).

Remember that when we add something to a product, we have to remove some of the distilled water amount to ensure it all adds up to 100% in the end. So if we add 2% silk amino acids, 10% aloe vera liquid, 2% panthenol, and 2% polyquat 7, we have to remove 16% from the distilled water amount. I'll note the changes in this recipe in bold.

MODIFIED TONER FOR DRY SKIN WITH POLYQUATERNIUM 7
HEATED WATER PHASE
53% distilled water
20% rose water or lavender hydrosol
10% aloe vera liquid
5% witch hazel
2% polyquaternium 7
2% silk amino acids
2% glycerin
2% sodium lactate
0.5% allantoin

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% panthenol
0.5% powdered cucumber extract
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

Measure all the heated water phase ingredients into a container and heat until 50˚C to 60˚C. Mix well, then let cool to 45˚C.

In a separate small container, weigh out your powdered extracts. Add some of the water from the heated water phase and mix well until the extracts have dissolved. Add back to the cool down phase.

Measure the liquid Germall Plus into the container, stir, then bottle in a disc cap or mister bottle.

Rejoice, for you have an awesome toner!

Let's say you want to include 2% honeyquat, 0.5% powdered 200x aloe vera, 2% Phytokeratin, and 2% panthenol, you'd be adding 6.5% to the recipe, so remove 6.5% from the distilled water amount.

MODIFIED TONER FOR DRY SKIN WITH HONEYQUAT 
HEATED WATER PHASE
62.5% distilled water
20% rose water or lavender hydrosol
5% witch hazel
2% Phytokeratin
2% glycerin
2% sodium lactate
0.5% allantoin
0.5% powdered aloe vera 200x

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% honeyquat
2% panthenol
0.5% powdered cucumber extract
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

For those of you with normal or oily skin, you can easily modify the recipes we made last week by following what we've done here. Add a hydrolyzed protein, aloe vera, panthenol, skin conditioner, and humectant to the simpler versions we made last week. Add up what you've added to the recipe, and remove that amount from the distilled water amount.

What modifications did you make this week? What do you think about those changes? Please share in the comments below! 

Join me next week as we modify this toner further to include some cosmeceuticals, water soluble oils, and more extracts!

If you'd like to play along or if you've missed a post, here's a listing of the complete series...
Newbie Tuesday: We're making facial products! 
Shopping list
Equipment list
Let's start making facial cleansers! - Your skin type
Surfactants - what are they?
Meet the surfactants
pH of our surfactants
Facial products - the base recipe
Turning your cleanser into an exfoliating cleanser (part one) - physical exfoliants
Turning your cleanser into an exfoliating cleanser (part two) - physical exfoliants
Turning your cleanser into an exfoliating cleanser by adding chemical exfoliants
Modifying your facial cleanser into a foamer bottle recipe
Creating a facial toner (part one)

If there's an asterisk beside a link, it means it'll take you away from my page to a supplier of those ingredients. These are not affiliate links; I receive nothing from these companies for clicking through or buying anything. As usual, I'm sharing where I get my ingredients from awesome suppliers.

1 comment:

Susan said...

Hi Susan,
I made three toners from last week, for dry skin, each one switching up the hydrosol (Rose, Lavender, and chamomile). They are all lovely, but I do especially like the one with Rose hydrosol. I made the modified recipe with all the lovely add ins today, and it smells divine! On my face it feels nice and fresh, and leaves it feeling soft and not dry at all. It is certainly better than any store bought version (in my opinion) that I have ever tried!

Question about silk amino acid / hydrolized silk protein. In the recipe, I used a liquid version of hydrolized silk protein at 2%. If I wanted to use the silk amino acid, which is in powder form, can I add that directly to the heated phase with the allantoin? I, unfortunately, do not know the rehydration formula for the silk amino acid powder (I know, I should know this, so I will have to contact the supplier), so I decided to stick with the hydrolized silk protein as I assume you used liquid in your recipe.

P.S. I also love the combination of using this toner with the foaming face wash. The face wash rinses off beautifully, and the toner is so refreshing on the freshly cleaned skin! I use it am and pm!!