Friday, October 14, 2016

Newbie Tuesday on Friday: Using botanical extracts in your facial cleansers (part three)

As we saw in yesterday's post and Tuesday's post, we can use all kinds of lovely botanical extracts to take our facial cleansers from great to mega-super-lovely-awesome!

If you followed the shopping list for this series, you would have purchased rosemary and chamomile for oily skin, chamomile and green tea for normal skin, and chamomile and cucumber for dry skin. Let's take a look at some modifications you could make using these extracts.

As a quick note, if you like the recipe you've made so far with the cleanser, just add 0.5% of each powder into a small amount of water - say no more than 10% of the water in the recipe - and mix well until dissolved. You may need to heat the water slightly to dissolve them faster. Then add to the total water phase and enjoy!

In this next recipe, I'm increasing the glycerin to 10% to give dry and sensitive skin more hydration. Normally this much glycerin would be sticky, but it's being rinsed off, so I'm not worried about including that much. If you don't like it, as usual, leave it out.

We're adding cucumber extract for its soothing and hydrating abilities, and chamomile extract for its soothing properties as well as its ability to reduce transepidermal water loss. Add each at 0.5% in the water phase as noted above.

Remember, when we add or increase an ingredient, we have to remove something else so the recipe totals 100%. In this case, we have increased the glycerin by 5%, added 0.5% chamomile extract, and 0.5% cucumber extract, so we have to remove 6% water (5 + 0.5 +0.5 = 6).

If you don't know why I'm doing what I'm doing here, please check out the other posts in this series, starting from the base recipe post. 

As an aside, I suck at coming up with names for products. Part of that is that I don't think it's helpful for you, my lovely reader, to see names like "sweet almond & aloe lotion" and think that's the only way to make that lotion. The part is that although I'm a writer, I'm not much for flowery language and description. So it's easier for me to come up with names like "basic lotion with humectants" or "toner for dry/sensitive skin". I'm trying to be more flowery and pretty Pinterest-like, so you'll see slightly more descriptive names in the future, but I'll always make it clear that you don't have to use named ingredients if you don't have to do so...

I share this with you because I'm including honeyquat in this recipe. It's a cationic polymer or like polyquat 7 that adsorbs or forms a fine film on your skin to condition it. Honeyquat is also a humectant that draws water from the atmosphere to your skin, which means it's a two-fer ingredient, which makes me happy. The reason I'm including it in this recipe is that I really wanted the next cleanser to have a really lovely name. (Hence the lengthy story above...) If you don't have it, please use the polyquat 7 in its place.

HONEY, CHAMOMILE & CUCUMBER FACIAL CLEANSER FOR DRY OR SENSITIVE SKIN
SURFACTANT PHASE
10% BSB
5% SLeS
10% cocamidopropyl betaine
10% glycerin
3% cationic polymer (honeyquat or polyquat 7, for instance)
2% hydrolyzed protein
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

WATER PHASE
49.5% distilled water
10% aloe vera liquid
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% powdered cucumber extract

CROTHIX PHASE
up to 2% liquid Crothix

Weigh the surfactant phase of the product into a container and mix. I suggest using a fork and mixing so you don't get a ton of bubbles. It's not the end of the world if it gets bubbly, but you'll have to wait a few days for the bubbles to go down.

Measure out a bit of water into a small cup, like a shotglass, to dissolve the powdered extract. Do your best to dissolve it, but don't stress too much if you can't get all the lumps out. It'll dissolve more when you add it to the rest of the water.

Add the water phase, phase then mix again until it is blended. Again, try to avoid too many bubbles.

Add the Crothix 0.5% or 1% at a time. Mix well with the fork. It will likely fall to the bottom, so I suggest stirring from the bottom to make sure you're integrating the Crothix. If it isn't thick enough, add another 0.5% to 1%.

What do you do if you have water soluble liquid cucumber extract? Use it as part of your water amount. So add 5% to the water phase - that's what's generally suggested, but check with your supplier - and remove 5% distilled water. (Remember, when we add something, we have to subtract something - usually the distilled water - to keep the recipe at 100%. Scroll back up to see more...)

Related posts:
One ingredient, five posts: Cucumber extract (this post has the links to all the previous posts, so I encourage you to scroll down and look at them all!)

Let's stop for a second and talk about water soluble versus oil soluble extracts. We can find extracts in all kinds of different liquids - oil, alcohol, glycerin, water - and we have to check to see if they're compatible. This lovely little bottle of green tea extract from Brambleberry* is oil soluble, so it won't mix into some surfactant blends - like our facial cleansers - easily without an emulsifier. It definitely won't mix into our toner or gel easily without an emulsifier.

This green tea extract from Lotioncrafter* and this one from Formulator Sample Shop are both water soluble.

Check the solublility of the ingredient - for instance, it should say "soluble in water" - or check the INCI name (the International Nomenclature for Cosmetic Ingredients) to see the full name of the product, and that should give you an idea of its solubility. If it says "sweet almond oil" or "something something triglycerides", it's oil soluble. If it says "water" or "glycerin" or "alcohol", you can use it in a product that contains only water soluble ingredients, like facial cleansers, toners, gels, and so on.

For normal skin, I recommended chamomile and green tea extract. As I mentioned above, chamomile is great for reducing transepidermal water loss and reducing redness, so we include it for all skin types. Green tea extract has much to offer as an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and maintainer of collagen and elastin.

CHAMOMILE & GREEN TEA FACIAL CLEANSER FOR NORMAL SKIN
SURFACTANT PHASE
15% LSB
15% BSB
10% cocamidopropyl betaine
3% glycerin
3% cationic polymer - I like polyquat 7
2% hydrolyzed protein of choice
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

WATER PHASE
39.5% distilled water
10% aloe vera liquid
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% powdered green tea extract

CROTHIX PHASE
up to 2% Crothix, if desired

Weigh the surfactant phase of the product into a container and mix. I suggest using a fork and mixing so you don't get a ton of bubbles. It's not the end of the world if it gets bubbly, but you'll have to wait a few days for the bubbles to go down.

Measure out a bit of water into a small cup, like a shotglass, to dissolve the powdered extract. Do your best to dissolve it, but don't stress too much if you can't get all the lumps out. It'll dissolve more when you add it to the rest of the water.

Add the water phase, phase then mix again until it is blended. Again, try to avoid too many bubbles.

Add the Crothix 0.5% or 1% at a time. Mix well with the fork. It will likely fall to the bottom, so I suggest stirring from the bottom to make sure you're integrating the Crothix. If it isn't thick enough, add another 0.5% to 1%.

If you'd like to play along with this series, please start at the top and work your way forwards to make awesome cleansers!
Newbie Tuesday: We're making facial products! 
Shopping list
Equipment list
Let's start making facial cleansers! - Your skin type
Surfactants - what are they?
Meet the surfactants
pH of our surfactants
Facial products - the base recipe
Newbie Tuesday on Tuesday: Modifying the recipe with aloe vera
Newbie Tuesday on Wednesday: Modifying the recipe with botanical extracts (part one)
Newbie Tuesday on Thursday: Modifying the recipe with botanical extracts (part two)

Join me on for Newbie Tuesday - actually on Tuesday next week - as we create some more variations on these cleansers! 

3 comments:

Unknown said...

Hey Susan,

I love how detailed all these posts are. Thank you so much for being so generous with your knowledge. They also make me wish we had more supply stores around that didn't cost an arm and a leg for shipping, so I could stock up my stash of ingredients to play with. I will play around with the recipe on this page this weekend and give some feedback. I'm excited to try some extracts. This weather doesn't make me feel guilty for staying indoors.

I did make the base cleanser recipe for dry skin, but I didn't like the smell of it, I think it was the chemically smell of the surfactants. I'm not a big fan of earthy scents that are so typical of essential oils, and am divided on whether adding a smidgen of fragrance oil is something I'd want to try.

Kaylee

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Kaylee! Why don't you take a bit out of the cleanser - say 25 ml - and try some essential oil in it. Let's say something like 0.2 ml? See what you think of it. The worst that happens is that you have something you don't like. Gift it to a friend!

Let us know how it turns out!

Brynna Stefanson said...

I just made the Chamomile and Green Tea cleanser for Normal Skin, and I feel a huge difference over the first basic formulation I made. I have DLS instead of LSB, and I did not end up using any Crothix, otherwise I followed your formula exactly. My foam feels nice and dense even without Crothix, likely in large part due to the glycerin and aloe. My skin feels well cleansed but not dry afterwards. I can feel the film-formers working, sort of hard to describe without it sounding unpleasant, but it actually feels quite nice! I felt much more comfortable making this batch, everything went much faster and smoother. Thanks!