Sunday, December 7, 2014

Weekend Wonderings: Making a biphasic make-up remover?

In this post, Recipe round-up: Make-up removers, Triska asked: So, a lot of the makeup removers in my supermarket are those bi- phasic ones you shake before using. I would love to try to replicate them but I just dont quite understand them, is it just that you have an oil phase and a water phase plus preservatives. No emulsifier? 

I had no idea what these things were until you asked the question, so let's take a look at what these are as products and how we might make one!

Here are a few examples of biphasic make-up removers. (I have to admit, it was hard to get information because a lot of these companies didn't have ingredients listed on their corporate sites.)

BioLine gentle eye make-up remover biphasic: Water Lily Extract, Allantoin, Macadamia Oil

Lord & Berry biphasic make up remover: Water, cetearyl ethylhexanoate, witch hazel, imidiazolidinyl urea, magnesium nitrate, methylchloroisothiazolinone, methylisothiazonlinone, colour

Sephora Collection waterproof makeup removerWater, Cyclopentasiloxane, Isohexadecane, Butylene Glycol, Dipotassium Phosphate, Caprylyl Glycol, 1, 2-Hexanediol, Potassium Phosphate, Sodium Chloride, Maltodextrin, Disodium EDTA, Panthenol, Poloxamer 184, Hydroxycetyl Hydroxyethyl Dimonium Chloride, PPG-26-Buteth-26, PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Centaurea Cyanus Flower Extract, CI 61570 (Green 5), CI 42090 (Blue 1 Lake), Apigenin, Oleanolic Acid, Biotinoyl Tripeptide-1, BHT.

What I can gather is that these are make-up removers that have an oil phase - a light oil or ester - with a water phase - might be water, might be extracts, might have some humectants in it - that are intended to remove make-up. Some are advertised as removing water proof make-up, some aren't. All claim to have some wonderful properties like removing pollution from your skin, anti-aging, and so on. In short, they are make-up removers with an oil phase and a water phase but no emulsifiers. You shake them before using. You can see the oil phase floating on top of the water phase in this picture.

And here's an example of one we could make, courtesy of Lubrizol. It is some water with a bunch of esters in it that has been pH balanced with citric acid. If you don't have esters, you can use the oils of your choice. I encourage you to use really light oils like fractionated coconut oilmacadamia nut oil, hazelnut oil, or some of the exotic oils like evening primrose oil or meadowfoam oilor very light esters like cetearyl ethylhexanoate or isopropyl myristate.

Here's an example of another one we could make, courtesy of B&T company. This one has an ester with some silicones and some lovely humectants. You can make changes here by using other esters in place of the one suggested.

I'm not really sure why someone would want something that wasn't emulsified. I like the version I make with water soluble esters because it's all mixed together and doesn't leave behind a really greasy feeling. Can you share your thoughts if you're using this product? Is it greasy feeling? Do you rinse it off? If so, does it rinse off cleanly? I'm really curious to hear your experiences!


Alexis said...

From my experience making a biphasic eye-makeup remover, please give considerable thought to the preservative(s) needed.

I used cyclomethicone for the oil phase, and it definitely needs its own preservative that is separate from the water phase's preservative. The contamination my formula developed was only barely visible between the unshaken oil and water phases.

Why I made one? To make a less expensive waterproof mascara remover. The $8 store brands do not work as well as the $25+ department store brands for me. I develop raccoon eyes pretty quickly even with waterproof mascaras! I need to use a waterproof topcoat, and they are more difficult to remove.

Now I use a water-based ester/emollient formula. It works better than any biphasic ever did.

Melanie said...

I accidentally found the best make up remover ever! (Though i haven't tried yours yet Susan!) I made a version of the olive cleansing oil recipe from lotion crafter which is simply 12% cromollient SE, 12% capric/caprilic triglycerides, (or squalane), 1% vitamin E and 75% olive oil. (or other oil I might try a lighter oil next time) It takes off the most persistent waterproof eye make up and doesn't get in yours eyes even if you open your eyes! First time ever for my sensitive eyes!

Freya said...

Could the oil part be preserved with 0.1 % benzoic acid? It's supposed to be oil soluble.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Freya. You could preserve the oil part with a paraben like Phenonip, I think. I think benzoic acid is only bacteriostatic?

Nurse Mi'el said...

I just wanted to leave my $0.02 on makeup removers in general (this is the first makeup remover post I've gotten around to - excited to read the previous ones):

Oil-based makeup removers work far better than any... I won't get into the terminology and embarrass myself, but straight up coconut oil has taken off any waterproof mascara, Revlon Colorstay (notorious) and hard-to-reach products like waterproof eyeliners used for the waterline or tight-lining.

I have used commercial biphasic products with some success but... coconut oil. It's so easy. I make my own baby wipes which are essentially just diluted castile soap with a homemade toner substituted for some of the additional water... rub coconut oil, wipe it off, quickly wash with a glycerin soap if you insist on double cleansing like I do, done.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

How are you preserving your wipes?