Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Pumpkin seed oil: Making a zinc oxide cream for my husband

In yesterday's post, we made a light lotion with pumpkin seed oil. Today I want to modify that lotion to include some zinc oxide.

So what's the deal with zinc oxide and why would I include it in a lotion? It is approved for use as an anti-chafing and soothing ingredient (in the U.S. it is classified under category 1, skin protectant). It is slightly astringent, so it is great for oily or inflamed skin. It is anti-septic, anti-microbial, and fungicidal, so it can act as a treatment for annoyed skin as well. And finally, it's good for relieving the prickly feeling and irritation of heat, so it's a good choice for summer products. As my husband will be working outside in this cold and windy weather, we thought it would be nice to have something he could use to help protect his skin or repair it.

How do we modify yesterday's recipe to include zinc oxide? Add 10% to 20% in the cool down phase of the recipe and mix well. (I like 20%.) Yes, that really is it. You can do this with any recipe. Add 1% to 20% zinc oxide in the cool down phase and mix well. It can be a body butter, heavy cream, light lotion, regular lotion, etc. Add some zinc oxide and you have a zinc oxide cream!

And yes, I'm a huge jerk for making you wait until today to see that one little modification. 

What do I think of this? Look at how fluffy the product remains, even with that zinc oxide in it! It goes on lovely - but very white.

Some of you might be asking what the SPF of this product would be because zinc oxide is a physical sunscreen. It isn't any SPF. We can't and won't make our own sunscreen around here. Heck, we're pushing the boundaries of what we can say about a product by saying that it might repair chapped skin! 

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Are you adding the 20% zinc oxide as you would an exfoliant in a scrub (i.e. the total product is now 120%), or are you removing 20% from the water phase to compensate? It looks like you're just adding the zinc oxide on as an extra, but I wanted to check to make sure. :-)

Thanks,
Katie Z

Bunny said...

This is going to be a long comment and I apologize in advance...

You're not a jerk; this is a cool modification! Are that with 20% insoluble powder in an anhydrous body butter would still work??

On a related note, I could use help incorporating another metal ion into a butter: magnesium! My sister found out that a) she's magnesium deficient, b) that magnesium is well absorbed transdermally, and thus c) asked if I could make one of your lovely body butter recipes and include magnesium oil. The only problem is that magnesium oil may look and feel like an oil, but is actually a dilution of magnesium chloride and water. On the other hand, solid magnesium chloride comes as big flakes and couldn't be added like the zinc oxide was here... and has a STUPIDLY high melting point, so I couldn't add it to the heated phase.

So! Knowing this "oil" wouldn't incorporate well I made a very hard butter-- 45% cocoa butter, 45% fractionated coconut, and 10% magnesium oil-- but it still has little tiny pockets of water which seep out when close to the top. Would there be any way to emulsify a small amount of very conductive water in an anhydrous product? Would an all-in-one like BTMS work?

Anonymous said...

Hi Susan
I would be interested to know what you and Raymond thought of the cream with the zinc oxide.
I tried making a winter hand cream about a year ago and added 20% zinc oxide but I found that my hands turned white and I left white smudges on everything I touched.
I thought I would try again this year and use less zinc oxide to see if that made a difference.
thank you - Beth

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Bunny. Yes, you could add an emulsifier to this product and create something that would work. You need an emulsifier for water. Let us know how it works out!

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Beth! We aren't using the zinc oxide for our hands - that would be too messy - but for our faces and elbows, mostly. You couldn't use this lotion on your hands because it would leave a terrilbe mess!

Hi Katie! I'm adding extra to the recipe. If I'd made it just as a zinc oxide, I would have included the 20% in the recipe, but I wanted to make up a lotion recipe first for the previous day's post, then modify it. So adding 20% over and above the 100% worked best.

Unknown said...

Just wondering with a light lotion or water based serum, how you prevent sedimentation using zinc oxide? How light can it be before it gets too light? :)

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