Monday, July 22, 2013

Making a Japanese themed body wash...

My husband loves all things Japanese (hence the Genshiken youth group he runs for the "society for the study of modern visual culture" at the library where they watch anime and read manga and discuss both for hours!) and I thought I'd make him a Japanese themed body wash with ingredients that remind me of Japan. (I mentioned the product in this post. We won't be including the activated charcoal!) The Formulator Sample Shop was kind enough to send me a few ingredients with which to play, so I thought I'd try a few of those things in this product.

Please note, I am not affiliated with any supplier or manufacturer. Sometimes I am sent things by suppliers for free, but I have made it clear to those suppliers that I will give my completely honest opinion about those ingredients. I am not paid by anyone to say anything on this blog! 

I also wanted something really moisturizing for the summer months as I'm showering every morning at the gym, running through the water park fully clothed with the youth group, and going to the lake regularly, and my skin is feeling really trashed. (I don't mind applying a light moisturizer afterwards, but I always forget!)

I based this recipe on my favourite body wash with esters recipe, but made tons of changes because...well, I felt like it. I don't recommend making tons of changes but I've made these over time, but didn't update the blog with them. I've added the bull kelp and biowater bamboo to this product for the first time. The rest of the ingredients remain the same.

JAPANESE THEMED MOISTURIZING BODY WASH WITH SEA KELP, BAMBOO, AND WILLOW BARK
HEATED WATER PHASE
12% cocamidopropyl betaine
10% ACI
6% polyglucose/lactylate blend
12% C14-16 olefin sulfonate
10% aloe vera
5% glyceryl cocoate
5% myristamine oxide
3% glycerin
2% hydrolyzed oat protein
9% chamomile hydrosol
5% water soluble shea butter
5% bull kelp bioferment

COOL DOWN PHASE
5% willow bark extract
3% Honeyquat
2.5% biowater bamboo extract
0.5% liquid Germall Plus
2% panthenol
1% fragrance oil

At the end, after fragrance and coming to room temperature - 1% to 5% Crothix

Heat all the heated water phase ingredients together and hold for 20 minutes at 70˚C. Remove from the heat and let cool to 45˚C before adding the cool down phase. Mix it all together and let sit until it comes to room temperature. Add up to 1% liquid Crothix, stir, and see if you like the viscosity. If you do, bottle the product and rejoice. If not, add another 0.5% liquid Crothix and stir. Continue at up to 5% liquid Crothix.

As a note, with these ingredients and Yuzu or Sweet Meyer Lemon fragrance oil from Brambleberry, at 5% liquid Crothix, this product is still quite liquidy. I would say on par with pouring a light "maple" type syrup out of the bottle.

I am having a love affair with this body wash! As I mentioned before, I have been making variations on this one for a while now, but this is the most moisturizing one I've made so far! The Crothix and emollients help, but I'm surprised at the difference a bit of the bull kelp bioferment has made!

So why did I use these ingredients? And can you make alterations if you don't have them? If you can't wait for the rest of these posts this week, check out the recipes in the surfactant based products section of the blog or the links below! Join me tomorrow for more fun with body washes!

Related sections:
Surfactants!
Surfactant based products (not shampoo) - recipe section

Related posts:
Formulating for dry skin: Creating a body wash from scratch (part 1)
Formulating for dry skin: Creating a body wash from scratch (part 2)
Formulating for dry skin: What else could we include in our body wash?

2 comments:

Robert said...

Your moisturizing body wash looks like a wonderful formula.

For those of us who make products for commercial sale we are under many cost constraints so we need to make compromises and could not make such a formula. Your formula is probably better than anything you can buy at any store.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

It bloody well better be better than store bought, otherwise, what's the point? :-)