Monday, April 1, 2013

OroGold wants promotion!

I can't believe it's only been a few days since I told spammers I would pick apart their products and tell my readers how to make them, but here we are with another spammer. And this one is rich, I tell you! OroGold Cosmetics decided to pay me a visit by spamming this post, so I thought I'd share the ingredients list for the OroGold 24k Multi-vitamin Day Moisturizer with you and help you make your own version. Unfortunately, we don't have access to gold - either the third ingredient or the near the end of the list - so we can't make an exact duplicate. But at $140 for 1.8 ounces - yep $2.60 for 1 gram of this moisturizer - I think we can be satisfied with just getting close to it.

As an aside, who actually responds to this spam? And what does it say about a company that hires someone to troll blogs to write comments but doesn't check to see if said spammer can write well enough to be understood. Great marketing, OroGold! You're getting my $140! 

The comments in brackets are mine...

Agua (water), Ethylhexl Palmitate (an ester), Gold (ha!), Capric Triglycerides (an ester, like fractionated coconut oil), Glycerin (humectant), Cathamus Tinctorious Oil (safflower oil), Stearic Acid (thickener), Cetyl Alcohol (emollient and thickener), Glyceryl Stearate Citrate (emollient), Octyl Methoxycinnamate (sunscreen), Glyceryl Stearate SE (low HLB emulsifier), Carbomer (makes gel), Aloe Leaf Extract (aloe), Allantoin (allantoin), Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Persea Gratissima Oil (avocado), Calcium Ascorbate (Vitamin C), Camellia Sinensis Extract (tea extract), Dimethicone (silicone), Panthengl (no idea, but might be panthenol), Calendula Extract, Chamomilla Flower Extract, Retinyl Palmitate (Vitamin A), Sodium PCA (humectant), Potassium Sorbate (preservative), Gold (huh? Twice in one list?), Thiamine HC, Riboflavin, Niacinamide, Pyrodoxine HC (last four are B Vitamins), Methylcobalamin (look at this link for more information), Calcium, Ascorbate (Vitamin C, already listed), Panthenol (humectant and B Vitamin), Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C, anti-oxidant), Phenoxyethanol (preservative), Ethylhexyl (not a full name), Glycerin (humectant), Fragrance

There really isn't anything remarkable in this list, except for the gold, although some ingredients are duplicated - gold, glycerin, possibly panthenol, definitely calcium ascorbate - and there isn't a high HLB emulsifier in the mix to create an emulsion. It contains sun screen, octyl methoxycinnamate, and a lot of vitamins. I'm really not sure why this would cost so much - hype + gold is my suspicion - and we could make a duplicate of it for under $3, including container.

This company doesn't put its ingredient lists on their website. Wonder why....

Why gold? From the website: "Gold and beauty are words that work well together. Throughout history, gold has been recognized for its luxurious and beautifying properties. Historians have long maintained that Cleopatra slept in a gold mask every night to enhance her captivating beauty. In ancient Rome, gold salves were used for of a variety of skin problems. In ancient Chinese medicine, gold was the key to youth; as the queen of the Ch'ing dynasty used a gold massage roller on her face daily. For centuries, pure gold has been used by the privileged and the wealthy as the secret to more youthful, beautiful skin. OROGOLD Cosmetics has included gold in our luxurious formula and made it possible to take advantage of these ancient secrets to their fullest, without having to be an actual queen to accommodate it...The ancients, who devoted massive amounts of time and energy to alchemy and label the colloidal gold as the “Elixir of Life”. The miraculous qualities of gold were known since the beginning of time."

Read that again. Is there anything in there that confirms that gold will do anything for your skin? What it basically says is that throughout history, people liked gold and ascribed magical properties to it. We put it in our moisturizer because it sounded nice. "Gold and beauty are words that work well together."

Okay, I've stopped laughing. Let's think of how we can duplicate this product...Find any moisturizer recipe and make it. There really isn't anything remarkable in this product. The oils are nice ones - safflower has lots of linoleic acid and avocado has lots of oleic acid - and the humectants are ones we can get easily from our supplies. If you have dry skin, consider using this facial moisturizer recipe and changing the oils and adding sodium PCA for the other humectant, or if you have aging skin, try this one with the same alterations. Or this new one with Ritamulse SCG. Or click here for a list of other moisturizers you could make.

After bottling the product, write a short story about an ingredient you might find in your product and put that on the label. "Glycerin has long been thought of as a magical water catcher due to its ability to absorb water from the atmosphere," or "Thiamine, Riboflavin, and Niacin can be found in the cereal Apple Jacks, which is known for its ability to nourish the body and feed the soul!"

If you compare this ingredient list to pretty much any other moisturizer, you'll see a ton of similarities. There is nothing unique about this product except the gold and the price. Is it a good moisturizer? Sure, why not! It has the things we want in a moisturizer - emollients (the oils, esters, and fatty alcohols), humectants (glycerin, sodium PCA, panthenol), vitamins (A, B, C), and anti-oxidants (the vitamins, for the most part) - but it really is nothing special about it, save the gold, which does nothing.

However, the inclusion of the gold gets my Miner '49er seal of approval! This is a prestigious award that we at Point of Interest have never given before. It is only given to those products that inspire my husband to yell "Gold!" and do a little prospector dance. (Which was both alluring and funny!)

As a note, I hate April Fool's Day pranks. This is not one. This is a real product. I'm off work today and doing everything my power not to do my physics assignment! 

Dear Spammers: If you enjoyed this slagging of your product, I encourage you to continue inundating my blog with your rubbish! I am more than happy to rip your product apart, encourage my readers to never buy it (and to tell their friends as well), and figure out how to duplicate it for a fraction of the cost. You want some attention? Well, here it is! Who said there was no such thing as bad publicity?

12 comments:

Ruben said...

Gold is one of the most nonreactive elements in nature. It is one of the only metals found in the ground as a "metal" instead of combined with oxygen like most metals. This low chemical reactivity, makes gold a lasting metal for items like jewelry, which can get degraded to some extent with time because mechanical erosion and not due to chemical reactivity. That said, it is hard to believe that gold has any effect on skin. It is a shame that a valuable metal like gold, with so many industrial applications needed for our modern life, is wasted as a marketing gimmick.

le Lucky Duck said...

You are very awesome, Susan!

Pipestone Soaps said...

This was awesome... You are Awesome!! LOL

DandiCreations said...

Love it!!!!

Diana

Organa said...

Amazing Post!!

Mychelle said...

Like. :) Could their gold-is-great short story be any more disjointed and badly written? Seriously.

Chaeya said...

Here is an interesting article which pretty much sums up that gold has no skincare benefits. A company called LaPrairie boosts collodial gold products and asks a king's ransom for them. Frankly, I think people can want something to work so badly that their belief is what powers it to work moreso than the product. I've lived through a number of MLM vitamin products, skincare lines, nutritious drinks that changed people's lives only to see scientifically, these items had little nutritious benefits. Sadly, you put anything in a cool, funky bottle and sucker a few old, rich ladies who are desperately cleaving to youth, you can make a nice living. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/27/fashion/27skinWEB.html?pagewanted=all

Chaeya said...

Just another blog that speaks about the horrible experience of getting coerced into buying this product, with a link to a forum filled with complaints about Oro Gold. http://www.beautysnob.com/2011/11/oro-gold-cosmetics-fools-gold.html. Their prices are even worse than this $140 product.

softshell said...

Awesome LOL! You are lucky to get spammed by skin care company, I don't even know how to get started on a Cialis review, that's what I get spammed bynalmost daily on my blog.

Paul Mather said...

Susan, while I ADORE your blog and I hate spammers. Think about this...

What if after your first post about spammers, somebody decided to play a prank on a competitor and spam on their behalf, so that you'd give away their recipe?

Or what if somebody wanted you to pick apart a product, which of course you usually don't, and figured ah, I'll just spam the product on her blog and she'll do it for me.

I don't think this is best use of your time personally. Just ignore the spammers, we do.

Marjo said...

Hahahaha amazing turn on spamming i love your humour!! :))

Danuta Kildan said...

Paul, I follow Susan's blog for long time, I made already half of her lotions and other products. I had just one fail, so far. In the store, for my own amusent; I look at the list of ingredients the cream and I can easily decipher it,I make the cream, thanks to Susan again.
There is no magic in the creams, all the secrets are marketing tool for the people who do not know what is in it. Gold is beautiful in jewelry:)

Thank you Susan for a good laugh :) Awesome post!!!!