Thursday, April 4, 2013

Ingredients: Natrasorb Bath

Natrasorb Bath (INCI Tapioca starch) isn't the kind of tapioca starch you can buy from a regular store. It's modified so it can hold a ton of oils - carrier oils and fragrance or essential oils - in a powdered state. It's hydrophilic - meaning it likes water - and it can absorb oils easily. When you're making something like bath salts or bath bombs, Natrasorb Bath will help fix the fragrance to make it last longer.

Do not confuse it with Natrasorb HFB (INCI Aluminum Starch Octenylsuccinate (and) Acrylates Copolymer (and) Magnesium Carbonate), which serves the same function. 

It's quite a fascinating process to see the way it absorbs oils! I measure out between 3% to 5% for my bath bombs and after adding up to 5% fragrance oil, it looks as if nothing had happened, except this really fluffy white powder now smells really great! I love to use it in my dry shampoo at 3% to 1% fragrance oil to make my hair smell nicer. You can use it up to 100% in any product. (Although at 100%, isn't it just a bag of Natrasorb?)

5 tablespoons (75 ml or a little less than 1/3 cup) weighs 8 grams! Ingredients like Natrasorb Bath are the reason I tell you not to use volumetric measurements. If you decided to use 3 ml of this product instead of 3 grams, I don't think the scale would register it!

96% Epsom salts
3% Natrasorb bath
1% fragrance oil
colouring (optional)

Measure out 3% Natrasorb bath and pour the 1% fragrance or essential oil into that container. Mix well. Add the Epsom salts. Add a titch of colour - if you're using liquid colours, I mean a drop or two! - and mix well. You're done!

66% Epsom salts
20% baking soda
10% citric acid
3% Natrasorb bath
1% fragrance oil or essential oil
colouring (optional)

Follow the instructions above by combining the Natrasorb bath and fragrance/essential oil first, then adding the rest of the ingredients. Only use a titch of colour as any more than that will set off the fizz!

50% Natrasorb bath
20% carrier oils of choice
29% Epsom salts
1% fragrance or essential oil
colouring (optional)

In any of these recipes, you can substitute Epsom salts for fine sea salts, but DO NOT use Dead Sea Salts in its place as it is really hygroscopic and will turn the product into a brick of fragranced loveliness that won't dissolve in the tub!

Join me tomorrow for fun formulating a foaming and moisturizing bath powders with this ingredient and others!


Anonymous said...

Just a quick comment on packaging for foaming bath products that combine baking soda and citric acid.

Glass containers with a tight seal, such as a bail jar or canning jar, can build internal pressure and explode, sometimes with significant force.

Katalin Michaels said...

Susan - your timing on this post is perfect - I've just discovered this product myself and I'm really excited about it. One thing I'm confused about, though (two things actually)... you say you use between 3 and 5 percent Natrasorb Bath, and even at 5% fragrance, it still absorbs it and looks as if nothing happened. I am not finding this to be the case with my stuff - and when I read the info sheet, it says that it starts to lose free flowing properties at 19% absorption (not sure if I said that right, but I think you know what I mean). Can you clarify if that's actually your experience? Also, just to be sure - is this product, whose inci is "Tapioca Starch", the same thing as "Modified Tapioca Starch", sold at Brambleberry, or another similar product called "Tapioca Starch Polymethylsilsesquioxane"? Thanks for your help!

Anonymous said...

That is a good question, Is the Natrasorb INSI Tapioca starch sold at Camden Grey the same as the Tapioca Powder sold at Bramble Berry the same thing? because they both list it as two completely different purposes but I'm thinking it is the same thing but am not quite sure. I use the natrasorb for my bath salts and wow! the fragrance definately last a lot longer.