Sunday, January 20, 2013

Facial scrubs: Working on our surfactant base recipe - part 2

We created a really basic recipe yesterday for a surfactant based facial scrub, and I think we need to take a bit of time to modify it so we can include mildness enhancers, thickeners, and lovely extracts our skin will like. This post will be about including humectants, then we'll take a look at including mildness enhancers and rinse off increasers before we take a look at using extracts and cosmeceuticals.

As a note, remember that this is a rinse off product, so we need to keep in mind a few things, including whether there's any point to include the ingredient if we're rinsing it off and whether it will resist rinse off!

My goal is to create something every skin type can handle in this post and the next, then we'll get into modifying it. Having said that, my goal is that I've offered you enough information in these posts and the linked posts that you can create a product you love and make those modifications. 

SAMPLE BASE FOR A FACIAL CLEANSER WITH PHYSICAL EXFOLIANTS
HEATED WATER PHASE
25% surfactant of choice
15% cocamidopropyl betaine
59.5% distilled water

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

ADDING HUMECTANTS!
Everybody doesn't like something, but nobody doesn't like humectants! Every skin type can benefit from using a humectant in a facial cleanser. As much as I like sodium lactate, it rinses off, so there's no point in using it. My first choice is generally glycerin as it's inexpensive and plentiful and I always have some in the workshop. It also helps increase bubble-age in our products, but that isn't generally something I want in a facial product, but it's kind of nice to know that. If you don't like the potential stickiness of glycerin - something I haven't noticed when it's lower than 5% in a facial cleanser - then check out the link above for other options!

I know there's some concern about it pulling water out of your skin, and I encourage you to read this post if you're worried about it! 

Some of our humectants offer double duty - honeyquat is a cationic polymer that offers conditioning and panthenol has some amazing properties for our skin (please click on the link for more information!), so spend some time reading up on humectants to choose one you will love! I'm going to add glycerin at 3% in the heated water phase, and you can quite easily substitute your humectant for it in the recipe without too many changes.

And yes, you can use honey as a humectant, but remember to use a really good preservative that specializes in hard to preserve ingredients, such as Germaben II at 1% in the cool down phase.


SAMPLE BASE FOR A FACIAL CLEANSER WITH PHYSICAL EXFOLIANTS modified to include glycerin
HEATED WATER PHASE
25% surfactant of choice
15% cocamidopropyl betaine
56.5% distilled water
3% glycerin

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

Note that when I added 3% glycerin to the recipe, I removed 3% water, going from 59.5% water to 56.5% to compensate.


SAMPLE BASE FOR A FACIAL CLEANSER WITH PHYSICAL EXFOLIANTS modified to include glycerin and honeyquat
HEATED WATER PHASE
25% surfactant of choice
15% cocamidopropyl betaine
56.5% distilled water
3% glycerin

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% liquid Germall Plus
3% honeyquat

SAMPLE BASE FOR A FACIAL CLEANSER WITH CHEMICAL EXFOLIANTS modified to include glycerin, honeyquat, panthenol, and AHA
HEATED WATER PHASE
25% surfactant of choice
15% cocamidopropyl betaine
48.5% distilled water
3% glycerin
5% AHA

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% liquid Germall Plus
3% honeyquat
3% panthenol

Note: This contains 5% AHA, so we probably don't want to include the physical exfoliants as it might be a little much for our more sensitive facial skin! 

And so on...

If you have dry skin, I really encourage you to start on this post and work your way forward as I did go into great detail for your skin type during this series! This is another post on foaming bottle cleansers that can easily to modified for exfoliants! 

Join me tomorrow for fun modifying this recipe further!

1 comment:

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Susan. Thanks for this series on cleansers which has me all curious about your own preferred face cleanser. I ask because I have personally never had any real success using surfactant based face cleansers. (not sure if it's sensitivity or just a dislike of the feeling of soap on my face). I have always been a bit curious as to how mild one can go with a surfactant based cleanser and still have it 'work'. I'd love to hear your thoughts in this.