Monday, July 2, 2012

A few thoughts for a July Monday morning...

It's summer, so just a quick reminder that you might want to store things like coconut oil 76 (meaning it melts at 76˚F) or virgin coconut oil in the fridge or freezer because they might melt in your workshop. It hasn't been that warm around here, but I found my virgin coconut oil was getting a bit melty this morning! Also consider storing your finished products like whipped shea, lip balms, or lotion bars in the fridge or freezer to avoid ruination!

As an aside, I'm loving coconut oil for my hair. I'm using the virgin coconut oil, and it smells absolutely of coconuts! I melt it, then dip my hair into the cup. I leave it for an hour or so to overnight, then wash my hair. Freakin' awesome! 

Remember, if your butters - mango and shea, specifically - melt in the heat, you'll want to temper your butter prior to incorporating them into a product to avoid grains.

As another aside, you remove something from the freezer so you can eat it for dinner that night, you're either defrosting it or thawing it. You aren't unthawing it. Unthaw isn't a word, but if it were, to unthaw something would mean you were freezing it. Also, "boughten" isn't a word. You bought a product. That's the past tense. And why do we call it Holloween instead of Hallowe'en? And why doesn't anyone use the apostrophe in Hallowe'en any more? But I digress...

Related post:
Heating, holding, freezing & thawing our oils

Are you watching this show "Doomsday Preppers"? One of their sponsors is Pampers. For seriously?

I still can't make anything I really like with caprylyl/capryl glucoside. I've made a few make up removers, but they feel so sticky compared to using something like PEG-7 olivate or Cromollient SCE. I've made one thing I liked - the Yuzu fragrance spray - but that's it. I let a little drip down the side of the bottle, and when I went back the next morning, the bottle was stuck hard to the glass cutting board on my workshop bench. To give you some perspective, I use a lotion that has 25% glycerin on my feet, and I don't find it sticky. I find almost everything with caprylyl/capryl glucoside too sticky!

6 comments:

Tara said...

For some reason, I am obsessive about using the apostrophe in Hawai'i :-)

Sally said...

I love your blog - it's fantastic! I have also been experimenting with caprylyl/capryl glucoside to make water-based fragrance sprays but am also finding it SO sticky. It is so thick and hard to work with. I was hoping to use it as an alternative to polysorbate 20 but am ready to give up and go back to the drawing board...

JenB said...

Yes, "unthaw" drives me nuts. But who says "boughten"? Oh, and I love coconut oil for my hair too.

Robert said...

I believe that caprylyl/capryl glucoside is an ingredient made by Seppic and sold under the tradename Oramix CG110. Because of its stickiness this ingredient is likely not a good general purpose solutilizer but it may have some limited uses as a fragrance/essential oil solubilizer in a surfactant system where the stickiness may not be so apparent. Interestingly enough, this product is no longer listed on Seppic's website. Perhaps this means that this ingredient has not been a great commercial success.

I would certainly be interested in a green/more natural solubilizer as an alternative to the commonly used ethoxylated solubilizers such as tween 20/80 and PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil. My search has led me to a solublizer sold under the tradename Symbiosolv SC which has the INCI name capylyl/capryl wheat bran/straw glycosides, aqua, fusel wheat bran/straw glycosides, polyglyceryl-5-oleate, sodium cocoyl glutamate, glyceryl caprylate. More information about this solubilizer may be found at:

http://www.kinetiktech.com/docs/news/0907.pdf

This solubilizer seems to have all the properties one could want including being PEG-free, 100% plant material, from sustainable resources and, according to the information given, not sticky. I would like to have the opportunity to experiment with this ingredient but, unfortunately, this ingredient does not seem to be available from any of the suppliers. Perhaps if one of the suppliers is reading this post, they would consider stocking this ingredient.

Sally said...

Hi Robert, I managed to get a very generous sample of the product you are referring to (I am in Australia). I got it from the Australian distributor for the product: IMCD http://www.imcdgroup.com/worldwide/australia/. They also seem to have an international arm so perhaps you could email them and ask for a sample (they sent me 100mls). I trialled it in a product that I make and it seemed to be very similar to polysorbate20 but without the stickiness. The issue I had was that their smallest pack size for purchase as 25kg! I have all the brochures etc they sent through on file if you'd like me to email them to you?

Alice said...

Hi Sally,
I asked a sample from manufacturer and have tested this Symbiosolv (I am in Romania EU) some days ago. Is producing excessive foam! Very unpleasant. Tried it with different essential oils and fragrances, at ratio 1:1 - 1:8. Everything below the ratio 1:4 (oil:solubiliser) provides turbid solution. Above 1:5 some of combinations was clear but with horrible foam that lasts untill next day.
I couldn't make even a simple body mist with this solubiliser. Ok, is not sticky, but this foam drives me nuts!
Can you please tell me in a few words what is your experience with this product? I thank you in advance for your time!
Alice