Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Solubilizers: Caprylyl/capryl glucoside

I wrote a bit about this solubilizer caprylyl/capryl glucoside in this post on glucoside surfactants, but let's learn more about it now!

Caprylyl/capryl glucoside (aka octyl/decyl glucoside or C8-10 alkyl polyglucoside) is an Ecocert non-ionic solubilizer with a pH of 5.5 to 6 that can be used as a solubilizer and a very gentle surfactant. It comes to us as a 60% active ingredient product, and the suggested usage is 1% to 10%. It can be used in our surfactant based products to increase viscosity and boost foaming, which is always a bonus, and it can also be used as a very gentle surfactant in things like make-up removers. It may be compatible with liquid soaps, but I haven't had a chance to experiment with that. (If you have, let me know!)

"Decyl glucoside is produced by the reaction of glucose from corn starch with the fatty alcohol decanol which is derived from coconut(s)." (From Wikipedia) Both Voyageur and The Herbarie note that it is of vegetable origin, but there isn't a specific origin noted. It is considered to be biodegradable and created from a renewable resource. As I mentioned, it's also Ecocert. And as I've seen it called natural all over the web, I think it's safe to call it that.

If you want to use it as a solubilizer to add oil based products to a water based system, there isn't a hard and fast rule about how much you'll need. I generally start with equal parts of the oily ingredient to the solubilizer. So start with 1% fragrance oil to 1% caprylyl/capryl glucoside and see if that gives the results you want. If it doesn't, go to 2:1 solubilizer to oil and continue on until you reach 10:1 (although if you need that much, you might want to consider another solubilizer!)

As an aside, this is something I found on Clorox's website about this ingredient: "Caprylyl/capryl glucoside (also known as octyl/decyl glucoside or C8-10 alkyl polyglucoside) is a mild surfactant used in household and commercial cleaning products. It is known for its foam boosting ability, lack of streaking, easy rinsing, and is ideal for glass cleaners." And this from this website about decyl glucoside: "APGs are very suitable for hard surface cleaners, such as bathroom cleaners and glass cleaners because of their excellent hydration, little water spot and little residue.Because of its strong tolerance to strong alkali, APG is very important in preparing high alkaline industrial cleaners." 


I regularly see people condemning ingredients like SLS or propylene glycol because they are used in commercial cleansers...It isn't looking good for caprylyl/capryl glucoside if that's how you determine what ingredients you'll use. Having said that, I'm trying this in a glass cleaner for my car! I'll step off my soapbox now...

Join me tomorrow for more fun formulating with caprylyl/capryl glucoside!

20 comments:

Anonymous said...

I made a glass cleaner about 3 - 4 weeks ago with the the caprylyl/capryl glucoside (from The Herbarie), a little coco glucoside (New Direction Aromatics), vinegar, and five fold essential oil. It is great but think I'll drop the coco glucoside next time based on the information you mentioned. The cleaner is great but could maybe be improved with using only the caprylyl/capryl glucoside.

Kathy said...

Susan - would Caprylyl/capryl glucoside mixed with an essential or fragrance oil keep the surfactant mixture clear? Would it act as a solubilizing agent for the EO or FO to prevent clouding of the surfactant?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Anonymous. Thanks for the suggestion. I'm going to play later today with a cleaning product, and I'll post it when I'm happy with it!

Hi Kathy. Can you wait a few days for your answer? The short answer is that the clarity seems to be based on the fragrance/essential oil choice, not the solubilizer. I could be wrong, but this is the way things seem to be working in my workshop!

Melanie said...

Interesting! I have been searching for an alternate supplier of PEG 40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil (EmulClear) since Snowdrift closed. (Haven't been able to find anyone who sells it in less than 20kg quantities, LOL!)

The EmulClear made excellent clear sprays that didn't separate afterwards like ones made with polysorbate can, but I am going to get some caprylyl/capryl glucoside with my next Voyageur order and play around with it as a possible substitute.

Even with the EmulClear, some essential or fragrance oils needed a slightly higher level of solubilizer to produce a nice clear spray, so I really agree with you on the need to experiment!

Aljonor said...

Fyi. Makingcoosmetics.com now sells peg 40 hydrogeenated castor oil

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

So does Voyageur Soap & Candle!

cuindalight said...

May I ask... when you create a water soluble oil (with whatever solubilizer poly 80 or Caprylyl/capryl glucoside - is it considered oil free? In other words, could I create a spray oil this way on my face with an oil I normally would not use on acne-prone skin, but get the benefits of that now water soluble oil - e.g. pomegranate or rice bran, etc. You have a few posts on this. For my body I am never worried - but for my face I am. Just bought some of the esters that i believe you say, you can use on your face for that acne prone skin - Peg 7 Olivate or the Water Sol Shea Oil from Herbarie... but still would love create more of my own with oils I like for my body - but to put them on my face? Thanks for any tips on this issue.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Cuindalight! Sorry to say, but we aren't creating a water soluble oil like the ester, but just an oil that is in water, so it has all the comedogenic problems it would without the solubilizer. I'll go into more detail in Saturday, December 21st's Weekend Wonderings.

Marsha said...

Hi Susan! I'm wondering if you could do a piece on Sodium Cocoyl Hydrolyzed Soy Protein aka Foaming Soy. I'm curious as to whether it can serve a dual purpose the way caprylyl capryl glucoside can as far as being an effective solubizer in my liquid soaps for solubizing excess fats and providing clarity. Thanks!

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Marsha. I've written about foaming silk and foaming oat before, and I have a post coming out about foaming rice, but I have no experience with foaming soy. If it behaves the same as the oat, silk, and rice, then you can use it in place of another surfactant, but it is a foaming ingredient, not really a solubilizing ingredient. I know nothing about soaps, though. Sorry.

Marsha said...

I must have missed those posts in my search. Thanks for letting me know. I did give the foaming soy a try, as the website Ingredients To Die For alluded to it being a solubilizer. It worked for 2 tests on one of my soap batches: 1 that I paired cetearyl alcohol with, and 1 without. Both turned out needing 12% foaming soy to solubilize and thus clarify, which I'm not amused with. I tried again with a Castile soap, olive oil soap....no go. Castile seems to be temperamental anyhow, but it shows foaming soy isn't consistent as a solubilizer.

Marsha said...

There has got to be a better way to order this item in the US. I'm not keen on not seeing my shipping costs up front when I have to enter my card info.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Where are you trying to order it from? There are at least two suppliers I know of, both of whom you can find in the FAQ. I would caution you though...it is a sticky ingredient, so you might want to reconsider based on your formula.

Okay, wait, I'm confused about which ingredient you are trying to order...

Marsha said...

The CCG is what I'm gonna try. I'm not concerned about sticky since its for liquid soap. Glycerin is pretty sticky as well and I do a full glycerin method soap and love it. I found 2 very reasonably priced suppliers, Voyager in Canada, and the Herberie in the US. They both calculate shipping after the order is placed so I won't know my total cost up front, let alone what shipping methods they offer and those costs. I found a supplier in Florida but they charge $28 for 16oz of this ingredient.

Chris Masters said...

Hi Susan,

Firstly thanks for writing these articles, they are amazing, really learning a lot in a short time as I work my way through them!

I have a question I wanted to ask, I would like to create a liquid solution that is made from:

Water
Cider vinegar
2% tea tree oil.

I would like to avoid using any ingredients or emulsifiers with C-ll or greater fatty acids and esters.

Would caprylyl/capryl glucoside work in this scenario?
If not can you recommend an alternative emulsifier or solubilizer?

Thanks in advance.

Regards

Chris

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Chris. I don't really like CCG all that much, but if it fits with your needs, then use it. You'll have to experiment with it to see if it'll solubilize what you want. As you can see from my experiments, it didn't really work for me. As an aside, you will need to use a preservative in the product you're making.

MOON SORA said...

Hi Susan,thanks to your amazing article, I've learnt a lot in a very short time!

Anonymous said...

Hi Susan,
Just like to ask if this ingredient is suitable for formulating a cream based moisturiser? Thanks!
Serena

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Serena. No. It's a solubilizer, not an emulsifier. Do a search on the blog for solubilizers to learn more about them! As a note, this is incredibly sticky stuff. Some dripped down the side of the bottle onto my wooden workbench, and it took some wood with it when I moved it! You do not want this in a facial product! It's too sticky!

Astrid said...

Hi

What a super blog of information! Thank you! I was wondering if you could advise on using coco glucoside in balms.i am trying to use it a an emulsifier for an oil and shea based balm, so that when it's applied to the face you can wash it off with water. So far I haven't been successful (or it doesn't wash off easily and you have oil on the face still) but also once the balm sets I'm getting weird little white blobs within it. Can you advise what might be causing this and what else would be a more effective emulsifier? Or do I need to look at a solubizer instead?

Thank you
Astrid