Monday, May 30, 2011

Why did I buy that? Caprol Micro Express

Caprol Micro Express (INCI PEG-6 Caprylic/Capric Glycerides (and) Polyglycerol-6 Dioleate (and) Glyceryl Caprylate/Caprate) is a non-ionic solubilizer that can create emulsions when you want to add something oily to something watery (so it's a bit like using polysorbate 20, polysorbate 80, or Cromollient SCE). It's water soluble, and it can be used at 10% to 15% in our products. It's reported to be less sticky than those other solublizers - which I can confirm as I've used it as a water soluble ingredient in toners and cooling sprays because it wasn't sticky - and it tends to create clear systems rather than cloudy ones.

As a note, the Herbarie carries a product called AquaEm that is very similar to CME with an INCI of PEG-6 Caprylic/Capric Glycerides (and) Polyglyceryl 6 Dioleate. As far as I can tell, you'd use it the same way you'd use CME. 

How is Caprol Micro Express different than these other solubilizers? There are three main ways...
1. CME feels less sticky than the other ingredients (at least to me).
2. I wouldn't use CME in something like a bath oil, but I would use Cromollient SCE and the polysorbates for that purpose.
3. It is supposed to create clear systems, whereas polysorbate 20 and polysorbate 80 can create cloudy systems.

One of the main ways to use CME is as a solubilizer and emulsifier for body and room sprays, specifically for getting the fragrance or essential oil to emulsify into the water in these products. Here's an example from Lotioncrafter for a room and linen spray using CME as the emulsifier for the fragrance oil. As Jenny points out, you'll want to use 1 part CME to 9 parts water with 1% fragrance oil. If you want to go to 3%, use 15% CME and reduce the water accordingly. Southern Soapers has some great PDFs on the topic of using CME as an emulsifier. Check out their PDFs Making Room & Body Sprays with CME and Room & Body Sprays

I like to use CME as a water soluble emollient in things like my toners - click here to see an example of a toner I created using CME as a water soluble ester - and emulsifiers for small amounts of oils in those products. (Here's an example of a gelled toner I made using CME as an emollient for my oily skin.) You can use it anywhere you would use something like PEG-7 olivate or other water soluble emollients! Here's where I've used it in a conditioner, and here's some information (scroll down) on how I might use it in a body wash. Click here to see how I used it in a facial product suitable for dry skin.

Join me tomorrow for more ideas on how to use CME in various products!

24 comments:

Madeaj said...

This will come in handy. I've been considering making a bug spray with the toner recipe. CME will give me a clear rather than cloudy product. In the past I've just mixed witch hazel, lavender, peppermint and sage in a spray bottle. It worked well, but I always mixed small amounts. Now I'll mixed it with a preservative, water and add citronella to the mix.

Tyler said...

OH NO! This product's being phased out by the manufacturer...Now what?! Any similar alternatives?

TinaJay said...

Phased out? It is still available on the website! I LOVE this stuff, please tell me this is an error!

Tyler said...

Tina,

No, the manufacturer is no longer making it. LotionCrafter only has about a few gallons left.

I'm looking for a replacement...

davisads said...

Has anyone found a replacement for CME?

Marsha said...

no exact replacement, but i found one of the ingredients in the blend is sold by this US company:

http://www.ingredientstodiefor.com/item/Natural_Surfactant_Enhancer/994?category=35#

I love using this supplier and i'm wondering what the HLB of this ingredient is. This will make it so much easier on me when I need to order supplies.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi everyone! I'm writing a post on this topic on Monday, June 9th with a few thoughts about what we could use in place of CME. I've also asked Jen at Lotioncrafter for an update on what the manufacturer might be doing as a replacement.

Hi Marsha. That links to caprylyl/capryl glucoside, a solubilizer that we can find in quite a few places, like Voyaguer Soap & Candle. Make sure you check the INCI of a product when you are ordering from a supplier who changes the name of their ingredients so you aren't buying it a few times under a few different names.

Between you and me, I wouldn't consider this a great replacement for CME as it doesn't necessarily create clear solutions and it can feel quite sticky.

Marsha said...

I checked the Incl, it's not the CCG. Its INCL is glyceryl caprylate caprate, a different substance from the caprylate/caprate glucoside, and is one of the ingredients in CME. Here is what seems to be a good source that describes its uses.http://books.google.com/books?id=XZ2QB7bu5LwC&pg=PA403&lpg=PA403&dq=glyceryl+caprylate/caprate&source=bl&ots=6N1WnCEPw0&sig=v-9d79FIktM1fRckfkyS_eLZoG8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=H0GTU8uNHdakyAShrYKwAw&ved=0CCkQ6AEwBQ.

You'd have to hunt it down a little on that page but it's there.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Jeez, sorry Marsha. I've been looking at the CCG for so long this morning, my brain went wonky. Have you asked them about the HLB?

The INCI suggestion is for everyone. If we're looking for substitutions for CME, we want to make sure that we are looking at the INCI and not the name the supplier is giving it as we might end up with a dozen of the same ingredient!

Marsha said...

Oh no worries. We all miss things. After reading some more of your blog on CCG and how unhappy you were with it I decided against it. When I pulled up the INCL from CME, Google searching took me to one of.my favorite suppliers. Unfortunately they dont post the HLB for all their solubilizers and emulsifiers. So I'll have to ask them.

Tyler said...

Thanks Susan for keeping us posted!

Tyler said...

Resassol VPF sounds promising. But where to find it?

Tony G Fugate said...

If anyone does find a comparable replacement for the CME, please, please, please share with us. I too, am desperately seeking this. Thanks so much.

Tony G Fugate said...

I just read that Lotioncrafter is going to be blending this in house for any others on the search for a replacement.

The Lady Marah said...

I'm curious,

Are the CME and Aqua Em surfactants. When you say non-ionic I immediately think surfactant, but I wanted to be sure. I'm looking for a non surfactant solubilizer. Thank you.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi The Lady Marah! They are non-ionic surfactants. You won't be able to find a non-surfactant solubilizer as all solubilizers are, by definition, surfactants. They are "wetting agents that lower the surface tension of a liquid, allowing easier spreading, and lower the interfacial tension between two liquids." (Wikipedia) So anything that you find that mixes oil and water is a surfactant. (If you are worried about whether surfactants are natural or not, we have surfactants in our bodies, including some really important ones in our lungs.)

I encourage that you read this post on surfactants.

The Lady Marah said...

Oh no, it's not the natural aspect. I'm just trying to sort out some confusion. So, are all surfactants considered cleansers, or only the foaming, detergent types?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

In theory, all surfactants cleanse, but there are differences between how they cleanse. For instance, some people use conditioners - cationic surfactants - as cleansers and feel that is enough for them. I know they aren't cleansing enough for me. You can use non-ionic products as cleansers - for instance, people who use cold cream or lotions to cleanse their skin - but again, that wouldn't be cleansing enough for me. There are non-ionic foaming cleansers, like decyl glucoside, that are good at cleansing, along with the anionic surfactants.

So to answer the question - are all surfactants cleansing? - I think you'd find someone who could argue that each type would be cleansing. I bet you didn't think you were asking such a complicated question, eh?

The Lady Marah said...

Not too terribly complicated. I find those grey areas in soap making all the time. I think my issue is a chemist called polysorbate a detergent, where nothing I've read has called it such. I know it's a surfactant. So if I were to use it in my liquid soap, I don't want confusion as to what is actually doing the Cleansing.

Sandra WONG MK said...

Hi Susan, I made a spray by using CMB but I found the spray was turned cloudy when the room temperature increased. Did you experience it? Is it fine to use such cloudy product? Or, it turns bad already!? Is there any way to enhance its stability? Thanks a lot! :)

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Sandra! I've written quite the post with all kinds of links today's Weekday Wonderings. I hope I've managed to answer your question there.

Sandra WONG MK said...

Hi Susan, Thank you very much for your detailed post with all kinds of links. Your blog is comprehensive. I learned a lot from you. Have a great weekend and wish your mum get well soon. Take care! Sandra

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Sandra! Thank you for coming back and letting me know that I managed to answer your question! It's always lovely to hear from readers once they've commented! :-)

Lisa H said...

This is such an old post but I hope you see it. Why would you use Glyceryl caprylate in an anhydrous cream? I am trying to duplicate a recipe of a discontinued product. This is the last ingredient listed. All else are oils, wax, hydrogenated castor oil and castor oil. I thought this was used to blend oil and water but why use if no water? How would it be incorporated?
Any help would be appreciated! Thank you.