Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Duplicating products: Lush's Sugar Plum Fairies

Anonymous (didn't leave a name!) suggested in the duplicating post that we take a look at replicating Lush's Sugar Plum Fairies scrub. (If you'd like to make a suggestion, click on the link and give me the full name, an accurate ingredient list, and a link to the product!)

Sugar (Sucrose): This is the scrubby stuff, our exfoliant.

Sodium Bicarbonate: Baking soda. It's a powder and it used here as both a scrubby exfoliant and a binder for the product. It's a base or alkaline ingredient.

Cream of Tartar (Tartaric acid): An acidic ingredient that is often combined with baking soda in cooking, it can cause an acid-base reaction with that ingredient. In this case, it's probably used to make sure the product stays together well.

Sodium Laureth Sulfate: SLeS is a mild surfactant that offers good foam and good skin tolerance. It will offer some nice bubbles and cleansing.

Styrax Resinoid (Liquidambar styraciflua), Vetivert Oil (Vetiveria zizanoides), Jasmine Absolute (Jasminum grandiflorum), Ylang Ylang Oil (Cananga odorata), Orange Blossom Absolute (Citrus aurantium amara): These are included for fragrance.

Plum Kernel Oil (Prunus domestica): An oil that comes from plum kernels. (Apparently it's obvious day around here!) It smells like marzipan, which means I really need to own some of this oil! It's similar to apricot kernel oil. With 68% oleic acid and 23% linoleic acid, you could use apricot kernel oil or sweet almond oil. I'm wondering if it's not in here for the fragrance because it smells of marzipan and this was a Christmas product?

Cocamide DEA: A surfactant used as a foam enhancer, slip enhancer, emulsifier, and re-fattener for our skin. It will boost bubbles and foam in our products.

Lauryl Betaine: Used to be very popular as the amphoteric surfactant in various products, it's been surpassed by cocamidopropyl betaine as a mildness and viscosity enhancer. Adding this to your product will add some great flash foam and foam stabilizing qualities.

Perfume: Makes it smell pretty.

Titanium Dioxide: Makes the product whiter.

Gardenia Extract (Gardenia jasminoides): More pretty smelling things.

Colour 14700, Colour 45410, Colour 17200: The colours in the product.

What do we have here? It looks like a giant bubbling and lathering bath bomb that you use to scrub your body. We use the liquid surfactants to bind it together, and I'm thinking we could make this a lot like a bath bomb. I'm worried about the cream of tartar because it can be very expensive.

When I make bath bombs, I tend to use 14 grams of oils for 180 grams of dry ingredients (about 7.8% liquids, including an oil and my fragrance oil at 1% to 92.2% dry ingredients. I'm going to try a 90% dry ingredients to 10% liquid ingredients in this product. This will include the surfactants, the oil, and the fragrance oils.)

So what would I try as a first attempt at replicating this recipe?

POSSIBLE DUPLICATION FOR LUSH'S SUGAR PLUM FAIRIES SCRUB
70% sugar
10% baking soda or sodium bicarbonate
10% cream of tartar
3% SLeS
2% plum kernel, apricot kernel, or sweet almond oil
2% cocamide DEA
2% cocamidopropyl betaine or lauryl betaine
1% fragrance oil or essential oil blend
Colour as preferred

Mix the sugar, baking soda, and cream of tartar together well. Add the surfactants, oil, fragrance oil and colour (optional) to the product. Mix well until the product clumps together in your hand well. Press into moulds and wait until ready (drying time will depend upon the size of your product). Ummould. Use. Rejoice (fa la la la la la, la la la la!)

After writing all of this, it is possible that the surfactants in this product are melt & pour soap as they seemed to be with the Sugar Babe sugar scrub. 

What would I make instead of this? I know we're supposed to be duplicating products, but this looks like a really drying product for our skin. I can see this one being way better with some oils and butters, so I'm going to try it tomorrow. Join me then to take the concept of duplicating a slight step further - by adding things we like to something to make it more awesome!

In the meantime, check out what Petra and I came up with for the Sugar Babe Sugar Scrub from Lush. This would be far more moisturizing than this product! 

4 comments:

David said...

I thought that Lush had gotten it right finally but it appears that they still haven't! Tartaric acid and Cream of Tartar are not the same thing. Cream of Tartar is Potassium Bitartrate which is a potassium acid salt of tartaric acid. Here's a good basic explanation: http://www.ehow.com/about_5650685_tartaric-acid-vs_-cream-tartar.html

David said...

Susan, thanks again for all of your hard work and for sharing it with everyone! I couldn't help but notice an error which I have seen in Lush product listings in the past and that is listing Cream of Tartar (Tartaric Acid). Cream of Tartar is Potassium Bitartrate and although related to Tartaric Acid, they are not the same thing. See this article for further explanation:
http://www.ehow.com/about_5650685_tartaric-acid-vs_-cream-tartar.html perhaps you might want to address this in your blog. Thanks again for your inspiration!

Anonymous said...

Hey, this formulation sure is sweet:) Actually I never tried out Lush products but they are kinda expensive.Particular product(s) caught my eye: thier shower smoothies. I really thought the ingredient list was nice especial since they didnt have SLS and their shower Smoothies seemed so luxurious though apparently they do not foam much. But darn are they expensive and I couldn't figure out how they made it ad I know for sure it wouldn't be castille soap as there is no potassium hydroxide or sodsodium hydroxide listed meaning they did not ise it like they do for castille soap .... I was wondering if you could recreate any one of them?

Kim Vermeiren said...

I know I'm pretty late to the party but I've recently started buying Lush, it's pretty nice to give ideas for what I can craft. I've always been wary of them considering their preservatives. Talking about preservative, shouldn't there be one in the scrub bar? I checked their website and it doesn't have a preservative either. It's supposed to be a product that gives multiple uses and comes into contact with water. Soooo... I'm confused... It does need one, right? Would germall plus work?