Thursday, June 3, 2010

Shampoo: Conditioning shampoo bars for dry hair

So how will a shampoo bar for dry hair differ from one for oily hair? We can't reduce the surfactants as we normally would for dry hair, but we can change the types of surfactants we're using and increase the oils and butters.

Dry hair likes gentle cleansing, so we want to use really gentle cleansers in this recipe. We can use a baby blend type surfactant, decyl glucoside, or SMC or SMO taurate in place of the C14-16 olefin sulfonate from yesterday. We can also use more cocamidopropyl betaine - so let's use 15% of this surfactant to 10% of the other surfactant. (Click here for the posts on surfactants...)

We want to increase the moisturizing, so let's include more oils and/or butters - you can try something like sal, cocoa, or another hard butter. We know coconut oil is great for hair, but it will soften the bar, so start at 5% and work your way up to 10% coconut oil in this recipe. (I'm suggesting 5% hard butter, 5% coconut oil to start off. If you don't mind it being a bit softer, then 10% coconut oil might work for you.)

We're also increasing the moisturizing by using SCI with stearic acid, which will also serve to make the bar harder. So we're decreasing the SLSa because we'll already have a harder bar and because some dry hair types aren't fans of SLSa. (Consider using another powdered surfactant here - although, to be honest, it doesn't look like any of them will play really well with dry hair!)

One of the things we generally like for dry hair are humectants, but adding humectants to this will draw water out of the atmosphere to the bar, making for a really wet bar. This is why we need to use a lovely conditioner filled with humectants after using a shampoo bar. Think of the shampoo bar for dry hair as a great way to wash and moisturize our hair with a little conditioning, but the conditioner bar as being the main moisturizer and conditioner!

CONDITIONING SHAMPOO BAR SUITABLE FOR DRY HAIR
HEATED PHASE
30% SCI (with stearic acid)
22% SLSa or other powdered surfactant
10% SMC or SMO taurate or other gentle surfactant
15% cocamidopropyl betaine
3% cetyl alcohol
3% Incroquat BTMS-50 or cetrimonium bromide
10% hard butter of choice
2% hydrolyzed protein

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% panthenol
1% dimethicone
2% essential oil blend
0.5% to 1% preservative

I'm not making a 2-in-1 conditioning shampoo bar for dry hair because that's just a bad idea for dry hair types!

To make this a clarifying shampoo bar, remove the 3% Incroquat BTMS-50 and 1% dimethicone and replace those with 4% emulsifying wax of some kind. Yes, I know I'd normally suggest against including non-ionic emulsifiers in a hair care product in favour of BTMS, but we need something to emulsify the oils so they'll stay on your hair.

Join me tomorrow for more fun with shampoo! 

36 comments:

Ketee said...

Susan !!! thank you so much.

sound great. :)

April said...

Question: at a place like the Herberie, when it says recommended usage rate for somthing (say, SMC Taurate) as a primary surfactant at 30-50%, is it assuming the rest will be mostly water?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi April. Water or another surfactant if you're making a shampoo bar.

Bajan Lily said...

Hi Susan, I've just ordered some surfactants to play with; not much: only 250g/ml of each so I can't go wild with experimenting ( you did warn that formulating was addictive AND potentially expensive!!)

I don't have SLSa or SMC Taurate, can I replace the SLSa with decyl glucoside or plantapon? Does a shampoo bar need 3 surfactants or was that a personal preference ie could I make something similar using only plantapon and lamesoft? Or even just SCI and decyl glucoside? And do shampoo bars only work well with powdered/solid surfactants?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Bajan. I like to have at least 50% powdered, prilled, or flaked surfactants in the product to keep it nice and solid. I've found if I go below 50%, it will be far too soft. If you must replace the SLSa, a shampoo bar really needs to have another powder. If you replace it with liquid, you will end up with a liquidy product (albeit a thick one).

Here's a liquid shampoo with SCI that uses the surfactants you have!

You can use any surfactants you want as the liquid part of the product - you can use one or a combination of surfactants. I use the cocamidopropyl betaine as a mildness increasing product (click here for more information on increasing mildness), and I've chosen SMC taurate as it is a good, mild cleanser for dry hair. But you can use just one or quite a few if you want. Each surfactant brings something different to the mix, and I like to combine surfactants according to the different things I want in a product. (Which is why I use a different combinations for a bubble bath, body wash, shampoo, and facial cleansers.)

Decyl glucoside has a high pH, so I'm not the biggest fan of it if you can't test the pH of the product. If you're using it at 10%, I don't think it will make a massive difference, but just be aware of it.

Read more about the various surfactants here - click here for the section - to see what you can switch with what!

Bajan Lily said...

Thanks. From what you've said there - I could potentially use 50% of just the SCI then - I'm going to give it a try!

Anonymous said...

Hello!

I would like to try to make shampoo bar, but i have only SCI without stearic acid. Can i just add stearic acid and then how much?? I was womdering to add 7% stearic acid.

Thank you very much!

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Anonymous. Add up to 10% stearic to this recipe and remove 10% of something else. I would suggest removing a little from the butter (2%), a little from the SCI (2%), a little from the SLSa (2%), and a little from the cocamidopropyl betaine (4%). Let me know how it turns out for you!

Anonymous said...

Thank you!

Im gonna try this soon and let you know :)

catherine said...

Hi. I made the shampoo bar for dry hair, hoping to answer the question how much stearic acid to add to sci to make 'sci with stearic acid.'

I started with 7.5% stearic for 22.5% sci. It was *way* too soft. I thought maybe bc I'd used half coconut oil/half cocoa butter for the hard butters.

So I reheated and add 3g more stearic. Still way too soft! I reheated adding 10 g stearic. Too soft. Added another 10 g stearic. And then another.

At this point it was just an experiment. I'd added 33 grams stearic acid for a total of 40.5 grams stearic acid, which ended up being 30%. This last batch is somewhat firm but still not hard like the conditioner bars I've made or what you'd expect for a bar of soap.

Is it possible I've received a bad batch of stearic acid? This has never happened with any ingredient I've bought. Maybe test the stearic by making a small batch of lotion??

Or maybe I was impatient and should have waited 24 hours for the bars to harden? (But they were really squishy, wouldn't pop out of the mold, etc)

I broke off a tiny piece and used it to wash my hands. No foam. Moisturizing. I wouldn't use it in my hair but maybe it would be ok as a very mild body bar? Or is it trash?

It was quite an investment getting all the ingredients. Now I feel nervous about using/wasting them.

I guess there's a chance I mis-measured but I really don't think so...I've gotten really good at measuring and these ingredients are very simple to weigh, and I made a 100g batch to start.

Maybe I'll try again but more cetyl alcohol and leave out the stearic? Any suggestions you or anyone might have will be greatly appreciated.

As an aside, in retrospect it was interesting how thick and opaque white the first batch was but as I reheated and added stearic it became more liquid and a clear golden color.

catherine said...

Reading through the blog, it seems that sci is kind of a wild card. Different brands have differing levels of fatty acids including stearic acid. Isn't this unusual? Usually if ingredients have the same inci you can expect them to behave the same way no matter what brand. But maybe it isn't the case with sci? It's almost like, if you list sci in a recipe, specify 'sci with stearic from soapcrafter' or 'sci from herbarie.'

In the recipe above I used 'sci pearl surfactant' from herbarie and 'Stearic Acid , Palm (PLMX16)' from ingredients to die for.

erica said...

Is there something else I can use to replace the cocamidopropyl betaine?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Erica. Why?

Anonymous said...

Susan,
Thanks for your blog. It provides a lot of helpful information. If water is another surfactant, can it be used in Shampoo Bar Recipes in place of the liquid surfactant that is in your recipe? What is your recommendation for using water?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Anonymous! Please use your name in the future as I don't allow anonymous posts. Water isn't a surfactant and we don't like to use it in a shampoo bar as it'll quickly turn into a liquid! Why not visit the hair care section of the blog to see other shampoo recipes that include water?

Sarah said...

Hi Susan,
I have African American natural hair and currently use sulfate free shampoos. Can I increase the % of SCI for the SLSa? What ingredient can I use to in place of SLS if any? Would love to make a sulfate free shampoo bar. Thank you in advance. Sarah

Ella said...

Hi Susan,this shampoo was one of the first products i started making (and using) regulary-so this one will be my first review:)
I changed a few ingredients-simply because i had them at hand and i couldn't get others(in my country supplies are hard to get-not much to choose from).
I used:
HP:
30% SCS
20% SLSa
15% Coco. Betain
8% coco glucoside(mild an i thought more liquid surfactants wil help dissolve solid ones:)
7% BTMS (couldnt get BTMS 50 so i used more 25)
3% cetyl
7% cocoa butter(good hardness)
3% shea butter

CDP:
2% panthenol
2% hydrolized oat protein
2% fragrance(honey and vanilla:)*i like to use more,because those shampoo bars always smell weird(even in the proces of making-not 'cause they would go bad) if not scented...don't know why, maybe it's just me.
1% preservative

I heated al ingredients from heated phase until they were melted(some white surfactant grains are always present:) and mixed it well. Try using two spoons or a spoon and a spatula,so you can scrape sticky melting mass off one another.
When it'all jeated,melted and mixed well, wait until it cools down 45°C and add ingredients from cool down phase.Again,mix well. I added some color and put it in a flower silicone mold.
Flowers were solid sood-they stayed solid even in a warm steamy "afterbath" bathroom. Make or buy soap dish for this shampoo, it's better to dry it after use.
Use ot pn very wet hair. It leathers beautifully,washes off easily. Use conditioner after,since i used no silicones your hair might feel little "squeekishly dragy",at least whem wet-when dry they feel very soft and look shiny;)


Winnie Stekelenburg said...

Last weekend I made the CONDITIONING SHAMPOO BAR SUITABLE FOR DRY HAIR and I love it. It lathers really well and leaves my hair soft and shiny. Afterwards I use a conditioner ofcoarse but if I for some strange reason would run out one day (don't think this ever will happen but let's assume) it would be ok.
I made the bar according the recipe with only a few changes:

HEATED PHASE
30% SCI (without stearic acid)
22% SLSa
10% decyl glucoside
15% cocamidopropyl betaine
3% cetyl alcohol
3% Incroquat BTMS-50
10% cacaobutter
2% hydrolyzed protein

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% panthenol
1% hydrolized oat protein
1% preservative
1% po

Ella said...

Hei Susan,
I made a solid shampoo for a friend of mine an he told me it turned brown! I used a recipe i always use (a modified version of yours for dry hair). I wonder what made it change color-it was the first time this happened. I used just a little bit of hidrated chrome oxide (turquise) pigment-could this be a problem? Or maybe fragrance-it was a fragrance for men (Gracefruit's Magnus). If you think it is something else i can write you my recipe-all of it...

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Ella. I'm not sure what is in Magnus - I couldn't find it on Gracefruit's site - but if it contains vanilla, it can discolour to a brown or beige colour. I think it's probably your oxide. It's not a great idea to use oxides or things of that nature in a shampoo bar as we don't know how they will change in the acidic pH or when water is around them and so on.

I looked up chromium (III) oxide, and it reacts in acid to produce something else, which is probably a different colour. I don't think it's any big deal to the product, but it might not look nice.

Can I make a suggestion? Don't use colours in the bars. It's just easier. Or if you do, use a water soluble thing like LabColours.

Cindy Pierce said...

I made these using SCI, SLSa, decylglocoside and coca betaine. Both my husband and I felt it our hair was extremely staticky and fly-away after using it. Just wondering what I could do to help that.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Cindy. Did you include any conditioning agents in the shampoo bar? This is why I recommend using something like Incroquat BTMS-50 or Incroquat CR or one of the cationic polymers like polyquat 7 or honeyquat.

Cindy Pierce said...

Yes, I did use 3% Cetyl and 3% BTMS-50. I basically followed the recipe exactly, except I wanted to try using herbals, so added 1% lavender powder, so I don't know if that was the culprit. If I added honeyquat, how much would I use and what would I need to subtract?

Sarah said...

Hello Susan,
do you have a shampoo bar recipe or formulation suitable for very dry hair using minimally processed ingredients or maybe less surfactants? Luv the idea of a bar particularly for travel. Thank you in advance!

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Sarah! No, you can't reduce the surfactants as the powdered ones are there to give the bar bulk. What would you replace them with and keep the bar solid?

Sarah said...

That was a quick response, thank you! Could'nt we use a hard butter to add bulk or hardness to the bar? know butters have different properties and have no cleaning properties. But aside from those two reasons is there any reason this would not work?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Sarah. You could try using a butter, but it would be more of a lotion bar than a shampoo bar, meaning it's not cleaning your hair but moisturizing it. For someone with oily hair, I find a small percentage of a butter can make my hair greasy. I can't imagine using more than a titch!

Tulsi said...

Hello Susan.
I followed your recipe but the bars are very soft. I forgot my SCI is without a stearic acid :-( So I added 10g of cetearyl alkohol, but it is still soft.
I do not know why it worked to Winnie Stekelenburg with this recipe which is almost the same as mine. My liquid surfactants were 10% cocamidopropyl betaine and 15% soidum sweetalmondamphoacetate, which was probably too much.
There is Winnie´s recipe:
HEATED PHASE
30% SCI (without stearic acid)
22% SLSa
10% decyl glucoside
15% cocamidopropyl betaine
3% cetyl alcohol
3% Incroquat BTMS-50
10% cacaobutter
2% hydrolyzed protein

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% panthenol
1% hydrolized oat protein
1% preservative
1% po


Thank you,
Tulsi

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Tulsi. Could you write out your recipe as you made it as you note you make a lot of changes and it would be more helpful?

Tulsi said...

Hello Susan.
Thank you...

HEATED PHASE
15g SCI (powdered)
11g SLSa (powdered)
7,5 sodium sweetalmondamphoacetate
5g cocamidopropyl betaine
1,5g cetyl alcohol
1,5g BTMS
2,5g cocoa butter
1,3g shea butter
1,2g coconut oil

COOL DOWN PHASE
1g panthenol
1g hydrolyzed rice protein
0,25g coco silicon
0,25g caprylic/capric triglyceride
1g lavender and sage essential oils

Finally I added 5g of cetearyl alcohol, I did not have stearic acid, so I tried it. It did not help.

Today I made one more effort. I put:
15g SCI (powdered)
11g SLSa (powdered)
3g sodium sweetalmondamphoacetate
2g cocamidopropyl betaine
6g cetyl alcohol
4 g BTMS
5g cocoa butter

1g panthenol
1g hydrolyzed rice protein
0,25g coco silicon
0,25g caprylic/capric triglyceride
1g lavender and sage essential oils
And even this attempt is not a hard bar. But it is much better.

I would like my liquid surfactants to be sodium sweetalmondamphoacetate and Sodium Cocoamphoacetate or Coco Glucoside. I will see which I choose.

I only try to find out the basic recipe. I am sorry. Anyway, I will buy a stearic acid stright away!
Thank you for the help and have a nice day :-)

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Tulsi. If you're having trouble with this recipe, I suggest upping the SLSa to 30% and see if that helps. (I use 30% in this recipe.) Also, you want to leave them out for a while to let them cure!

Tulsi said...

Hi Susan.
Thank you. I tried to increase SLSa but again too soft. I already have a stearic acid but I will have to add more.
I do not have SCI flakes, only powder, so I am not sure how much stearic acid I should add.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Tulsi. Try 3%. And check out the post I linked to in the comment above. It is about how to modify shampoo bars and what the skeleton recipe looks like so you can make changes. As well, you may need to let them cure for a few weeks.

nikki daniels said...

Hi Susan! My question is how long does it normally take for SCI to melt into a Smooth consistency? I tried your shampoo bar recipe yesterday? And I was storing for over an hour and I still don't think it was smooth enough. Thank you

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Nikki! I'm writing about your comment at greater length in Sunday, April 2nd's Weekend Wonderings. I have loads of answers for you then!

Ostrijj said...

Hello! I've been addicted to this blog since March. I ordered my ingredients and then made several of the recipes two weeks ago, but wanted to use the products for a bit before leaving a comment about how they turned out! I didn't have all the ingredients for this shampoo bar, so I modified it a fair bit. I also used the basic recipe as my base, but my hair is dry and bleach-damaged, so I thought this might be a good place to post. This was my recipe;
Heated Phase
60% SCI (jordapon prilled)
10% cocamidopropyl betaine
15% olefin sulfonate
3% cetyl alcohol
3% BTMS (25)
2% cocoa butter
2% stearic acid
Cool down Phase
2% cyclomethicone
2% fragrance
1% cetrimonium chloride
I added some stearic acid, because my SCI didn't have any added, but it doesn't feel draggy. I also increased the amount of SCI because it was my only dry surfactant. I melted the heated phase together in a tiny 250ml pyrex jug, (which are adorable, by the way). I then waited until it was cooled to 45c and then added the cooldown phase. I squished it into a silicone muffin pan, (here's a tip, get some good scissors and cut the silicone so you have individual moulds, makes things easier). I shoved it in the freezer for about an hour. I left it for a day, then gave it a test spin. I've used it about four times since then. It holds it's shape beautifully and hasn't gone all smooshy, despite dropping it several times!
I love this bar, I was using a mild shampoo that was quite expensive, but it had honey in it, and after reading about how some humectants can make frizzy hair, well, frizz, I think that might be the reason my hair was always poofy straight after washing. I don't use a hair dryer or any heat, so it wasn't that.
This bar has a lovely foam that doesn't make my hair squeaky clean, but definitely cleans my scalp better than the liquid shampoo. It's so easy to use, I can apply it just to the top of my head and then rub it in. I can't wait to make another, more complicated, version of this bar, adding panthenol, dimethicone and polyquat 7.
Thank you so much, Susan, you've given me a fantastic hobby and taught me a lot. And gotten me addicted to collecting tiny pyrex jugs! I've been telling everyone I know about this blog. I'm going to go and leave reviews on other recipes that I did, I hope it's helpful.
Amy