Friday, June 25, 2010

Conditioners: Modifying the leave-in conditioner with extracts or hydrosols!

Extracts and hydrosols in your leave-in conditioners can offer anti-inflammatory, anti-irritancy, anti-oxidant, film forming, and moisturizing benefits to an already awesome product! We know our botanical ingredients can have awesome benefits in a rinse-off conditioner - which ones could we choose for a leave-in conditioner?

Well, most of them would be suitable - check out this post for some ideas. And you already know how to tweak your conditioners, right? Just substitute the hydrosols for the water amount, and add your powdered extracts in the cool down phase by dissolving them in a little hot water, then adding them to the mix.

Here's an example of something you might want to try...

SWIFT'S FAVOURITE LEAVE IN CONDITIONER MODIFIED TO INCLUDE ALOE VERA, LAVENDER, AND ROSEMARY
HEATED PHASE
59.5% water
2% Incroquat BTMS
4% glycerin
11% aloe vera
10% lavender hydrosol
2% hydrolyzed oat protein

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% polyquat 7 or honeyquat
2% cetrimonium chloride
2% panthenol
2% cyclomethicone
2% dimethicone
0.5% powdered rosemary extract
1% fragrance oil
0.5% to 1% preservative (I use liquid Germall plus at 0.5%)

Use the general or alternate instructions for making conditioners.

In all honesty, I couldn't use this recipe in the summer as the aloe vera would be far too humectanty for my frizzy hair, but it would be a good recipe for someone with oily hair and a scalp that needs a little soothing, or someone with dry hair who can use a lot more moisturizing. Try your favourite hydrosols in a leave in conditioner!

And remember that using hydrosols and extracts in your conditioners can lead to some lovely product names! If I wanted to make something for dry hair with a little oil, some nice humectants, and some anti-oxidants, I could put together a lovely leave-in conditioner like this, that I might call...

CHAMOMILE & GREEN TEA HYDRATING LEAVE IN CONDITIONER
HEATED WATER PHASE
58.5% water
10% chamomile hydrosol
10% aloe vera
4% glycerin
1% hydrolyzed protein of choice (I'd use silk for dry hair)

HEATED OIL PHASE
2% Incroquat BTMS
2% cetrimonium chloride
up to 4% oils of choice (2% for normal hair, 4% for dry hair)

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% cationic polymer (like honeyquat or polyquat 7)
1% panthenol
2% cyclomethicone
2% dimethicone
1% fragrance oil
0.5% to 1% preservative (I use liquid germall plus)
0.5% green tea extract

Or you could put together a nice leave in conditioner for normal hair with rose hydrosol, honeyquat cationic polymer, and this stuff I bought at Voyageur, Vital Scalp Complex. (It's supposed to contain things to help exfoliate our scalp, help with collagen production, help our hair proteins stay hard and resistant to breakage, and it's used at 1% to 5% in our recipes. Does it do all of this? I don't know - I just liked the idea of honey, fruit & flowers together and I couldn't find a suitable fruity extract I liked for this recipe.) 

I would provide you with more information but apparently Arch Chemicals doesn't recognize my name and password for my login, even though it lets me go to my account to change my password and account information! So I have an account I can alter, but I can't actually login with it! ARGH!

HONEY, FRUIT & FLOWERS LEAVE IN CONDITIONER FOR NORMAL HAIR
HEATED WATER PHASE
56.5% water
10% aloe vera
10% rose hydrosol
4% glycerin
1% hydrolyzed protein of choice

HEATED OIL PHASE
2% Incroquat BTMS
2% cetrimonium chloride
up to 4% oils of choice (2% for normal hair, 4% for dry hair)

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% Vital Hair & Scalp Complex
2% cationic polymer (like honeyquat or polyquat 7)
1% panthenol
2% cyclomethicone
2% dimethicone
1% fragrance oil
0.5% to 1% preservative (I use liquid germall plus)

So there you have it - so many variations on leave-in conditioners you probably won't know where to start! Join me tomorrow for a few ideas on creating detanglers! 

6 comments:

Felicia said...

This post is perfect. I was wondering about adding herbal extracts to my leave in conditioner- specifically marshmallow root. It has amazing detangling properties (I have curly hair) and ant- inflammatory proprieties as well.

However I have really only seen the dried root itself (used to make tea and such.) I was wondering how would I incorporate that into the conditioner recipe. I have seen how you boil the root and strain it and it makes a mucus like substance.

Would I just weigh some out and add it to the cool down water phase like i would the powder form?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Felicia. I would suggest contacting your supplier to get his/her opinion on what to do with their extracts. I haven't heard about marshmallow working as a detangler. It is supposed to add slip and glide to a product (as a mucilage), but it isn't a positively charged ingredient, so it's not going to have any long lasting conditioning powers. (Side note: This isn't a huge issue because there are lots of ingredients we use in our conditioners that don't offer conditioning power, but it's worth mentioning!).

I'm not sure what your experience is a formulator and creator of products, but making a tea or concoction of some kind with water can lead to contamination if you aren't using a really good preservative at the maximum level. Again, I suggest you speak to your supplier.

Are you making this leave in conditioner or is it a store bought one to which you are adding ingredients? I wasn't sure from the context of your comment. Please don't add anything to store bought ingredients!

Felicia said...

Hey Susan! thanks for getting back to me- I sorta forgot about my earlier comment until now :)

You're right, marshmallow root adds slip- not really detangling properties.

I am currently trying to make my own leave in conditioner just for my use and a few family members. Currently my recipe has the BTMS- 50, water and aloe juice, a bit of oil (jojoba and avocado.) I like the current recipe I have at the moment. However I do want more detangling/ slip and I thought about adding the marshmallow root to help achieve it.

It would be me making the tea because I have not been able to find an already formulated liquid marshmallow root extract other than in health food stores for sore throats and weight loss. Of course I would be using distilled water and using a perseative for that part of the mix.

But could I get the same properties and results from the powered extracts? I'm just a bit confused about extracts

Veronique said...

Hi Susan, I tried making the green tea leave in twice and it failed miserably both times (my only product that has ever failed) I know in the deep conditonner I put the centrimonium chloride in the water phase, and in this recipe it's in the oil phase. I also noticed my btms has a really hard time melting, even after an hour on the stove (for the regular conditioner it melts super easily and I use the same oils in both) Do you think it might be failing because of the centrimonium chloride is is in the oil phase. Thanks again for your amazing blog, keep up the good work!

Southern & Fabulous said...

Hi Susan! Perfect timing on this topic. I have a question regarding powder herbs. I want to include Burdock Root in the powder form in a conditioner, but am unsure as how I would incorporate it.

I attempted to make add some to my water phase but it never dissolved. Not sure what I did wrong.

Thank You!

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Southern & Fabulous. What is the solubility of burdock root? Oil or water soluble? Please please please use a broad spectrum preservative at the maximum amount if you are including an extract like this to prevent contamination.