Sunday, June 27, 2010

Conditioners: Detanglers with Incroquat CR

We took a look at using cetrimonium chloride in detangling sprays yesterday, so let's look at Incroquat CR, another great detangling ingredient. Incroquat CR is easier to find than cetrimonium chloride and it will allow you to include some oils and silicones, if you want. You won't get a clear product out of this recipe, so if that's a consideration, please use the cetrimonium chloride based recipe from yesterday.

We'll start with a low level of Incroquat CR and a lot of water, then we'll take a look at tweaking this recipe with lots of hair lovin' goodies!

BASIC DETANGLING SPRAY WITH INCROQUAT CR
HEATED PHASE
95.5% to 97.5% water
1% to 3% Incroquat CR

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% preservative
1% fragrance oil

Use the general or alternate instructions for this recipe.

You must have some idea of what's coming next - tweaking it to include other goodies! Remember that you can't include a ton of oils and silicones in a conditioner with Incroquat CR. It's an emulsifier, but it's not a great one, so we'll include water soluble goodies instead of oil soluble ones. I'd use oat protein or another high molecular weight protein for this recipe as we want film forming, not moisturizing.

Having said this, if you have really dry tangled hair, then silk protein will be ideal. I don't know why I'm making assumptions that fine hair won't like silk. I know as a rule fine hair won't like silk, but there are fine haired people out there with dry hair!

DETANGLING SPRAY WITH INCROQUAT CR
HEATED PHASE
91.5% to 93.5% water
1% to 3% Incroquat CR
2% hydrolyzed protein

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% preservative
1% fragrance oil
2% panthenol

There you have it! A detangling conditioner with Incroquat CR!

But wait...could we make this more detangling? Yep, just add 2% cetrimonium chloride to any detangler with Incroquat CR and you'll have a fantastic leave in detangler (you might remember this from the cream rinse post).

DETANGLING SPRAY WITH CETRIMONIUM CHLORIDE AND INCROQUAT CR
HEATED PHASE
89.5% water to 91.5% water
1% to 3% Incroquat CR
2% hydrolyzed protein
2% cetrimonium chloride

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% preservative
1% fragrance oil
2% panthenol

Have fun formulating! Join me tomorrow for more detangling formulating fun with Amaze XT!

5 comments:

Tara said...

You say fine hair doesn't like silk? What does fine hair like? Are there general rules for what hair type likes what type of protein? I'm not really good at judging the effects of these sort of things on my hair. My hair type is thin, fine (limp), slightly oily, a little dry at the ends. My son's hair is almost crispy in areas and curly. I would like to to use the appropriate ingredients for each of our hair products.

Thanks Susan!

Diane said...

Can I add humectants to this and can I add a polysorbate if I wanted to add oils?

PrettyAliceMoon said...

How do I know what types of things I can add and what I can't? Like the other commenter said I'm not good at telling the kinds of effects in my hair type. My hair is thick, curly/wavy, frizzy and tangles easily. I'd appreciate your help. Thanks so much!

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi PrettyAliceMoon! If you check out the newbie section of the blog, you'll see I have a detailed tutorial about making conditioners, which includes a lot of things you could try using in a recipe. As well, I have an entire section devoted to hair care where you'll find loads of ways to modify conditioners. And do a search on the blog for "conditioner" because I have written a lot about this topic!

It'll be trial and error. Make a basic recipe of water, conditioning emulsifier, and preservative and see what you think of it. Then add a protein or a cationic polymer or...one more thing. Then use it and see. And go from there. Make small batches, and keep good notes. Before you know it, you'll have an amazing conditioner! Or try some of my recipes and see what you think. (This is the easier and cheaper way!)

PrettyAliceMoon said...

Thanks, I'll check out the newbie section and read about the conditioners. I'm new to all this so I don't even know what a cationic polymer is.