Saturday, April 3, 2010

Formulating for your skin type: Sugar scrub for other skin types

So how do we alter this recipe for the other skin types? Here's our recipe from yesterday for dry skin...

EMULSIFIED SUGAR SCRUB FOR DRY SKIN
10% emulsifying wax or Polawax
10% cetyl alcohol
10% cocoa, sal, illipe or kokum butter
10% shea butter
30% soy bean oil
26% olive oil
1% Vitamin E
2% fragrance or essential oil
1% phenonip preservative

Oily skin: This may not be the best product for you as it is very oily. If you want to use a product like this, consider using more cetyl alcohol (for oil free moisturizing - add 10% cetyl and remove the shea butter) and some lighter oils like fractionated coconut oil or sunflower in place of the olive oil. (Although having said that, the olive oil is really really lovely!) Or consider using mango butter in place of the shea butter. You can use BTMS in place of the e-wax as it will feel drier and offer conditioning benefits.

EMULSIFIED SUGAR SCRUB FOR OILY SKIN
10% emulsifying wax or BTMS
20% cetyl alcohol
10% cocoa, sal, illipe or kokum butter
30% soy bean oil
26% fractionated coconut oil or sunflower oil
1% Vitamin E
2% fragrance or essential oil
1% phenonip preservative

Rosacea prone: Oily or dry skin can benefit from tons of anti-inflammatory ingredients like extracts and hydrosols. But we can't get those into an anhydrous product, so we can use specialty butters and oils to get what we need. Shea butter is a great anti-inflammatory butter, so let's keep that in, or consider using aloe butter or green tea butter for the anti-inflammatory benefits. We can use oils high in phytosterols like soybean, olive, or sesame seed oil. (I really love the soybean-olive or soybean-sesame seed oil combinations.) Or you could use up to 10% borage or evening primrose oil, then 20% of one oil and 26% of another, but that could get expensive.

EMULSIFIED SUGAR SCRUB FOR ROSACEA PRONE SKIN
10% emulsifying wax or BTMS
10% cetyl alcohol
10% cocoa, sal, illipe or kokum butter
10% shea butter
30% one oil
26% another oil of choice
1% Vitamin E
2% fragrance or essential oil
1% phenonip preservative

Acne prone skin: This probably isn't the product for you. Sorry.

Pigmented or wrinkled skin: Again, there's not much you can do to alter this recipe because you're limited to using anhydrous ingredients, but you could choose an oil high in conjugated linoleic acid or CLA as these oils have been shown to offer some skin lightening benefits as well as benefits in reducing the look of photo-aged skin. Calendula oil might be a great choice in place of another oil high in linoleic acid (like sunflower or soy bean) for pigmented and wrinkled skin, and pomegranate oil is a great choice for someone with wrinkled skin. Unfortunately, this can get a bit expensive, so using either or both at 10% will offer all the benefits without breaking the bank! You're already getting a ton of exfoliation, so we don't need to include ingredients to help with that!

EMULSIFIED SUGAR SCRUB FOR WRINKLED OR PIGMENTED SKIN
10% emulsifying wax or BTMS
10% cetyl alcohol
10% cocoa, sal, illipe or kokum butter
10% shea butter
30% one oil
26% another oil of choice
1% Vitamin E
2% fragrance or essential oil
1% phenonip preservative

*Note: To turn this into a body scrub, start with 100 grams of sugar per 100 grams of sugar scrub. You can increase it as high as 200 grams for 100 grams of sugar scrub - it depends upon your taste (I like it really scrubby, so I go for 200 grams per 100 grams of sugar scrub.) If you are using another exfoliant, you'll really have to play with it to see what you like. Consider using salt (although this can sting broken skin), loofah, or seeds. I've tried this recipe with jojoba beads and really didn't like it. It wasn't scratchy enough for my tastes!

**Note: We're using 2% fragrance oil because we're actually making 200 grams of product by adding the sugar, so the increased fragrance amount will actually make the product smell nice. If you're using essential oils, check your safe usage levels before adding to the scrub.*

Weigh all ingredients except the fragrance or essential oil in a heat proof container and put into a double boiler. Heat and hold for 20 minutes at 70C. Remove from the double boiler and put into your fridge or freezer until it reaches 45C. Add the fragrance oil, then return it to the fridge or freezer to cool further.

When the mixture starts to harden slightly on the sides of the container and gets a thick film on the top, remove it from the fridge or freezer and start whipping it with a hand mixer with whisk attachments or your Kitchenaid with whisk attachments. Whisk until it looks like vanilla pudding - this might take a little while - then add the sugar and whisk until well incorporated. Pour into jars and let sit until hardened, usually over night.

As a note, some people whip this in a Kitchenaid for hours to make it extra fluffy. I'm an impatient woman so I don't do that. But if you have a Kitchenaid mixer, try it with the whisk attachment to see how fluffy you can get it.

Join me tomorrow as we start our series on surfactants! Yay!

3 comments:

Meaue said...

Whoo-hoo - looking forward to the surfactants! I need to understand those a bit more!

Rachel said...

Could I substitute Optiphen for the phenonip if I want to go paraben free?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Rachel! Take a look on the post on Optiphen and see if it works in anhydrous products. Look in the preservatives section of the blog.