Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Pressing eye shadows: Liquid binders - dimethicone

I figured dimethicone would be a good choice as a non-oil binder. It's not volatile like cyclomethicone, and it comes in different weights so I could use a light weight one to mimic the success I had with fractionated coconut oil. Because it's an oil, you don't need to add a preservative and it is has an awesomely long shelf life, which means your eye shadow should be good for longer.

I used 350 c.s. dimethicone from Voyageur as my binder. Again, I chose 1/2 tsp eye shadow powder with 15 drops dimethicone from a 3 ml pipette. This time, I decided to mix the dimethicone into the container instead of in the bag. I put the powder in the container, tapped it down, then added 15 drops dimethicone and stirred and stirred and stirred until it looked like it was completely mixed in. The sides of the container were incredibly messy, but I figured I could clean that up later.

Again I used a quarter wrapped in plastic wrap to press down on the powder. I pressed very hard, then used the spoon to press harder. After about 2 minutes of doing this - I only stopped because I was getting bored of just pressing on a quarter - I tested it. Very well compressed, very nice. I used the brush on it, and it resisted my very hard pressing to loosen it from the pressed state. The colour was nice on the brush, and I think it worked well.

My verdict?
It pressed very well, but again I should have used more powder. You can see how much it compresses and I should have filled the container almost to the top.

If you want to present this to someone, consider not mixing the binder in the container. It made an awful mess (as you can see from the picture) and I don't think anyone would want this as a gift or a purchase. For me, I don't mind so much for personal use.

It worked well with my brush after pressing.

Dimethicone appears to be a good choice. It felt nice and silky and left good colour behind.

15 drops appears to be a good amount for 1/2 tsp.

I understand dimethicone can make your colour morph over time, so I'm going to leave it a little while and chart the results. (Note: 10 days later and there doesn't appear to be a colour change in this eye shadow. I wonder how it would affect other colours?)

Join me tomorrow for fun with pressing using denatured alcohol!


Row said...

Hi Susan; Just posting an experiment I tried. I put together a fixing medium recipe for pressing makeup after comparing some major brands. I plugged the following in my lotion calculater and came up with this recipe for 1oz.
60% Dimethicone 17.01 gr
20% Cyclomethicone 5.67 gr
10% Polysorbate 20 2.83 gr
5% any C12-15 alkyll benzoate 1.41 gr (em-ester,silk solv)
5% alcohol (91-99%) 1.41 gr

3 lg scoops grape pop
3 lg scoops lemon pop
2 lg scoops your alternate eyeshadow base

3 weeks later and all's well . No cracks,great slide, color is great.I pressed it doing 2 layers with a 20 minute drying time between. Would sure like it if a seasoned presser would try this and give me their opinon.
Thanks Row

Anonymous said...

oh I knew I'll find everything I need here! THANKS!

Anonymous said...

Hi Susan,
Do you have an idea whether dimethicone 350 or 100 would be better for pressing eyeshadows? ("Better" here meaning an eyeshadow applies more opaquely, or, barring any difference there, which would require a smaller amount to press?) I know here you're using 350, but I can't find a comparison.

Also, do you think a mix of fractionated coconut oil and silicone would be a good binder, or should I stick with just one?

Thanks so much, as usual!

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Sherri. Hit "older post" to see the post I wrote on FCO. I don't think there'll be a huge difference between 350 or 100 cs. I have tried 1000 cs as well, which is thicker, and they seem very similar.