Sunday, April 26, 2009

Better crafting through chemistry: Condition-eze 7 (Polyquat 7)

Isn't it beautiful? This is the polyquat 7 molecule. The N+ group is what makes this a cationic - the nitrogen makes all the difference!

Polyquat 7 (or Condition-eze 7, as the ISP product is known) is a cationic quaternary polymer that can be used in hair care and body care products to impart conditioning and moisturizing. (Please visit the honeyquat post to learn more about polymers and compounds.) Like Honeyquat, it is positively charged and is substantive, meaning it will adsorb to your hair or skin. It is water soluble and can be added to surfactant, conditioning, and lotion systems at up to 5% (I like to use it at 3%). It is a humectant, meaning it draws water from the atmosphere to your body or hair, so it can take the place of glycerin and it isn't as sticky, and it is a moisture binder. It is a viscous liquid that comes in a bottle and is water soluble.

I'm personally a big fan of this product, and love to add it to pretty much everything! So why use this instead of honeyquat? Because people like me can't get honeyquat as easily as we can Condition-eze 7 (I have to order honeyquat from the States, which means lengthy delays, increased shipping charges, and duties, which can add up to more than 75% of the order price!)

You would use polyquat 7 the way you use honeyquat, by adding it at up to 5% in your surfactant systems - for instance, body washes where the conditioning acts as a moisturizer and humectant, or in a hair product to make a "2 in 1" shampoo with conditioning agents - or by adding it in a lotion to work as a humectant. (Click here to read the honeyquat posts for skin care and hair care products.)

If you add polyquat 7 to any mixture, remember that it is cationic, so please consider this when using Tinosan as your preservative.

19 comments:

Helen said...

Fantastic website. Great information! I would like to try making the solid condtioner bars. Where can I buy honeyquat or condition-eze or another cationic ploymer?

I live in Delta. I couldn't find anything on the Voyageur or Aquarius sites. Thanks for any info you can share!

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

I'm afraid Voyageur isn't carrying Condition-eze 7 (polyquat 7) any more, and Aquarius doesn't have it. I'm not sure if Voyageur will be replacing it with something else. You can get honeyquat at the Herbarie and other retailers in the States, or you can get polyquat 7 from the Personal Formulator (where you can get cetac as well!)

You can leave the cationic polymers out of the solid bars if you want, but they are very useful in liquid products!

Helen said...

thanks Susan. I was up all night working and I found honeyquat on the WSP site and ordered some. Too bad I didn't know about the polyquat 7 at the Personal Formulator-- I ordered the cetrimonium chloride from them. Oh well! Now I know where to get the items. Thanks again!

Sanguine said...

Hello,
Thank you for writing such an amazing blog, you opened a whole new world for me! On the webshops in europe I can't seem to find polyquat, but I can find polyquaternium 7. Is this the same? If not can I use it like polyquat?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Polyquat 7 is polyquaternium 7! So you've found the right thing!

Kristen said...

I've been researching and I seen voyageur has polyquaternium 7, can I use this instead of in incroquat cr in my solid shampoo recipe. I'm using the polawax instead of BTMS because I find it is expensive and I can't find cetrimonium bromide.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Kristen. The reason for Incroquat CR or BTMS or cetrimonium bromide is because they are positively charged or cationic ingredients that will condition your hair. Polawax is neutrally charged or non-ionic and brings nothing to your hair, so you might as well leave it out. You can use polyquat 7 as a conditioner in a solid shampoo as it is positively charged, but it won't be as conditioning as Incroquat CR, BTMS, or cetrimonium bromide.

Kristen said...

Hi Susan I made the shampoo bar and I ended up using the BTMS 25, incroquat cr and polyquat7. My very first recipe turned out ausome they were hard as rocks I used the SCI just how it is and tried to melt it in the amphosol and bio as90 it took an hour or two and was still not fully melted, I moved on and added the rest of the ingredients, the mixture was really hard to mix it was so thick. I made these a couple of times since and i blended the SCI to a fine powder to help with melting the mixture is a lot easier to mix but the bars are softer than the first batch. They are hard enough that they will hold up in the shower , but I'm just wondering why the same recipe would turn out different. Also I have fine thin hair and I really like the shampoo bar but am finding it makes my hair really shiny, almost greasy looking and when I wash my hair and it drys my curls are the best they have ever been but when slept on once the fall flat, that never happened before when I used shampoo liquid. I have some ideas of what it could be but I thought you would know best, here is the recipe I used:

40% SCI ground
20% Bio as90
15% DLS
10% Amphosol
3% cetyl alcohol
3% BTMS 25
2% Conditioner concentrate(sub 1:1 for incroquat cr)
1% Coconut oil
1% Cromiost
1% Panthenol
2% Fragrance oil
1% Dimethicone
1% Germall plus

Davina McClees said...

I've seen Polyquat 7 in no lye relaxers. Can I add it to lye relaxers? Also how do I know how much to add?

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Kristen! Your hair might not like the surfactants you're using. Take out the greasy components - take out the cetyl alcohol, oil, BTMS-25, dimethicone, and conditioner concentrate - and see what happens. And it might be that this product isn't for you. Out of curiosity, what are you using as a conditioner?

Hi Davina! Look at the suggested usage rate to see what you would use. Having said this, I think a product like that is best left up to the professionals because there are so many things that could go wrong in making something with lye that is so alkaline.

Kristen said...

Hi Susan I have left out the conditioner concentrate by mistake but it didn't seem to make it different. I'm struggling with how hard my bars are, I can push my finger into it with only a little give. I have been using commercial conditioner I've been meaning to make the solid conditioner bar.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Kristin. The AS90 tends to make the bar softer than using SLSa, which might be your issue. I'm afraid I don't know what to say about your hair issues. Could it be the conditioner? There isn't anything else I can think of at the moment....

Kristen said...

Hi Susan your right it was the conditioner I was over using and I think it was making my hair greasy and fall flat so now I only condition the ends. My first time I made these bars I used the SCI and AS90 mixture but didn't blend the SCI to a powder so I had to cook it for a long time to melt them together. Do you think cooking them longer would make a harder bar, because all my other batches I haven't had to cook as long because I blended the SCI for easier melting.

Nicole said...

Hi Susan, I'm really keen to make a leave in conditioner however I am unable to source BTMS in Australia. I can source Polyquat 7 so was wondering if I could substitute this instead. What is the actual difference between a cationic polymer and a cationic compound? And do I still need some form of emulsifier if I was to add small amount of coconut oil? I have cetyl alcohol. Really appreciate your help as all your recipes call for BTMS which I can't get.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Nicole. Have you checked out the suppliers' list you can find in the FAQ of the blog? (Scroll down a bit to the bottom...) I looked up the first one on the list, Aussie Soap Supplies, and found they carry BTMS!

Nicole said...

Yes, they do but unfortunately are on the other side of the country and require a $60 minimum spend plus freight on top of that. A little expensive for $10 product. I was hoping I could substitute with Polyquat which I can source from my local supplier.

Hobbiz said...

Hi Susan. I bought Polyquat 7 from a local supplier and it is very thick, just like Castor Oil. I mix it in water but it seems do not solubilize well. Stirring makes bubbles and slight milky solution. Can you advise me how to mix Polyquat 7 properly? Thanks.

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

Hi Hobbiz! I've never had a problem mixing polyquat 7, and there's no proper way to mix it, as far as I know! Are you using distilled water? Is it warm or cold? Can you give me more specifics?

hobbiz said...

Hi Susan! Thanks for your response. I disappeared for a few months :) . I am checking the real INCi with my supplier. Things go chaos here. :) . I learn a lot from your marvelous blog. Keep up Susan!